debrief

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debrief

(dē-brēf′)
tr.v. de·briefed, de·briefing, de·briefs
To meet with (one who has undergone a traumatic or stressful experience), especially for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.

debrief

(de?bref')
To question carefully and thoroughly a person, crew, or staff after completion of an operation in order to find out how successful the operation was and how to improve future operations. debriefing (?bref'ing)
See: brief
References in periodicals archive ?
Paradoxically, knowing that professional debriefers are involved may even cause family and friends to hang back.
In some instances, only one debriefer may be feasible due to practical considerations such as availability, commitment, and dependability.
This would require certified strategic debriefers to be assigned to support intelligence specifically by using Civil Affairs (primarily white and green) information.
Notably, although the training is split into two phases, the material is identical and graduation confers the same debriefer certification.
The debriefer will assign the answers a numerical value and average the criteria together for an overall assessment value.
Previously, she served as Course Manager for the Reserve Component Defense Strategic Debriefer Course.
The Army needs soldiers who can execute contact and informant operations, perform interrogator and strategic debriefer functions, and execute Cl tasks from tactical to national levels.
The debriefers know to extract information, not to give information.
Detainee is extremely egotistical, has manipulated debriefers and guard staff, and will continue to attempt to do so to support his political agenda.
Debriefers and counselors need to be attentive to the missionaries' sense of loss, for they have lost their home itself as well as their ministry base.
The researcher was cognizant of this throughout the process and used peer debriefers and an inquiry auditor, all of whom had no direct experience with the program or the students, to review analyses and documents for hidden assumptions and biases.
The themes and the follow-up questions were shared with the rest of the research team members (one professor, one boundary spanner), who acted as peer debriefers.