debility


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asthenia

 [as-the´ne-ah]
debility; loss of strength and energy; weakness. adj., adj asthen´ic.
neurocirculatory asthenia Da Costa syndrome.
tropical anhidrotic asthenia a rare condition occurring under conditions of heat stress, in which miliaria causes extensive occlusion of the sweat ducts producing anhidrosis and heat retention that may lead to weakness, dyspnea, tachycardia, elevation of body temperature, and collapse.

de·bil·i·ty

(dĕ-bil'i-tē),
Weakness.
[L. debilitas, fr. debilis, weak, fr. de- priv. + habilis, able]

debility

/de·bil·i·ty/ (de-bil´ĭ-te) asthenia.

debility

[dibil′itē]
feebleness, weakness, or loss of strength. See also asthenia. debilitating, adj.

debility

Lack of strength. Debility is due to loss of muscle bulk and reduction in the efficiency of the heart and respiratory system from disease or disuse. Debility is often the result of negligible demands on the body and, in this case, is remediable.

debility

The state of being feeble or without strength.

de·bil·i·ty

(dĕ-bil'i-tē)
Weakness.
[L. debilitas, fr. debilis, weak, fr. de- priv. + habilis, able]

debility (debil´itē),

n weakness; lack of strength; asthenia.

debility

lack or loss of strength; weakness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several always suspected that their mothers had exploited their debility, exaggerating or prolonging it, to induce them to share their burdens and attend to them.
4) The master narrative of "decline," in Gullette's opinion, colors people's view of their future selves, long before chronicity or debility diminish capacities in middle age.
200 YEARS AGO: His Royal Highness Prince Edward is on his passage from Halifax in the Topaze Frigate, having received such a severe hurt in his thigh by his horse falling and rolling on him, as to occasion extreme numbness and debility in the limb, for w hich the Faculty advise the use of the bath water.
Victorian adverts tempted drinkers by claiming the water was ``wonderfully efficacious for anaemia, indigestion, rheumatism, insominia, neuritis, debility etc''.
An employment tribunal in Glasgow heard Mr Cumming of Mannering Way, Paisley, went off ill in June 2000 suffering from nervous debility and depression.
Many suffered from general debility or were underweight, poorly, run down, often absent from school," she said.
They are as a rule stunted in growth, ill-shaped, and frequently ill-formed in the chest; they become prematurely old, and are certainly short-lived, they are phlegmatic and bloodless, and exhibit their debility of constitution by obstinate attacks of dyspepsia, and disorder of the liver and kidneys, and by rheumatism.
24 /PRNewswire/ -- Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia are one of the major causes of debility and death in the elderly.
For doctors called to the deathbed in areas where disease was rampant and sanitation almost non-existent, it would have been difficult to differentiate between the symptoms of poisoning, dysentery and many other forms of sickness and debility.
More than a century ago, Duncan Napier developed his famous Nerve Debility Tonic for 'depression and melancholy where one could sit down and cry'.
Typically venous leg ulcers affect older people where the most common symptoms are chronic inflammation of the ulcerated leg, debility, pain (often so severe that patients need to take sleeping tablets at night), and social stigma from infection.
Although foot-and-mouth disease does not kill animals, it does reduce their ability to produce good meat, milk or wool and would lead to many years of farming debility.