debility


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asthenia

 [as-the´ne-ah]
debility; loss of strength and energy; weakness. adj., adj asthen´ic.
neurocirculatory asthenia Da Costa syndrome.
tropical anhidrotic asthenia a rare condition occurring under conditions of heat stress, in which miliaria causes extensive occlusion of the sweat ducts producing anhidrosis and heat retention that may lead to weakness, dyspnea, tachycardia, elevation of body temperature, and collapse.

de·bil·i·ty

(dĕ-bil'i-tē),
Weakness.
[L. debilitas, fr. debilis, weak, fr. de- priv. + habilis, able]

debility

/de·bil·i·ty/ (de-bil´ĭ-te) asthenia.

debility

[dibil′itē]
feebleness, weakness, or loss of strength. See also asthenia. debilitating, adj.

debility

Lack of strength. Debility is due to loss of muscle bulk and reduction in the efficiency of the heart and respiratory system from disease or disuse. Debility is often the result of negligible demands on the body and, in this case, is remediable.

debility

The state of being feeble or without strength.

de·bil·i·ty

(dĕ-bil'i-tē)
Weakness.
[L. debilitas, fr. debilis, weak, fr. de- priv. + habilis, able]

debility (debil´itē),

n weakness; lack of strength; asthenia.

debility

lack or loss of strength; weakness.
References in periodicals archive ?
explores Irish writer James Joyce's (1882-1941) obsession with health, debility, and medicine, and the appearance of such concerns throughout his work.
Yet, on the other hand, the entire spectrum of opposition forces considers the country to be facing a tremendous problem, that the time has come for change and that the stability which the NDP speaks of and makes sure to maintain is only stagnation and debility.
I use Mr Napier's combination of these herbs that he called his Nerve Debility Tonic.
Rhodiola rosea has been used for centuries in the medicinal traditions of Asia, Eastern Europe and Scandanavia to enhance physical and mental performance, stimulate the central nervous system and treat depression, stress and debility.
This implies that the chain provider has a greater incidence of longer stays, driven in part by differences in case mix and in part by longer stays among cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, ill-defined debility, neurodegenerative, and respiratory patients.
This complication causes considerable debility and major social inconvenience for the patient.
Cattle suffered from diseases including east cost fever, debility, diarrhea, ticks and worms infestations, CBPP, NS4BQ and malnutrition.
Later other pessimistic voices arise, such as Mary Moss, George Miller Beard, and others who felt that the technological annihilations of time and space and this new heightened level of activity were leading to increased nervousness, debility, and other ills.
Supplementing basic training recruits with calcium and vitamin D supplements may significantly reduce debility and financial costs related to stress fractures, the authors concluded.
EN found an 1881 New York Times' article that cautioned that ice water could "derange the circulation" and "cause debility of the stomach.
For example, the retired gentleman cured of deafness, blindness, nervous debility and indigestion (you would not imagine that the last of these troubled him unduly) could only be contacted through correspondence.
Despite chemotherapy, Mr Rose suffered from increasing pain, breathlessness, anxiety, panic attacks, and debility until he died on December 10, 2006.