debilitation


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debilitation

being in a state of debility.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Africa alone, over 1 million people die each year from malaria, while millions more suffer significant debilitation from the disease.
In truth, it is astonishing to behold, through a remarkable group of works on loan, the longevity of the posture of melancholy in painting, sculpture, and graphic arts across centuries during which the meaning of melancholia was continually reinvented: as frenzy, frustration, or despair; as a malady with natural causes (the imbalance of black bile, one of the four humors, according to Hippocrates); as a divine affliction and a cosmic source of creative inspiration or genius, and of heroic deeds; as a realm of the tormented psyche populated by demons; as a force of nervous debilitation (first subjected to modern clinical observation during the late nineteenth century by Charcot); as a spiritual or philosophical preoccupation with death.
Specifically, the women's individual experiences of debilitation were applied to existential themes surrounding death, freedom, isolation, and meaninglessness.
Alzheimer's patients with debilitation and muscle wasting may experience weight loss
Although deaths have been reported in human adults, infections typically result in transient neurologic debilitation (14).
4,5) The residents of nursing homes usually have significant levels of debilitation, often arising from numerous chronic conditions.
A deeply-stressed pet may show a general debilitation in its health.
In a nutshell, Thompson's work examines the proposition that gentry culture, hailed as "the hero of expansion" (the gentry emulation hypothesis) for the eighteenth century, was for the twentieth century impugned as one of "stagnation and contraction" (the gentry debilitation hypothesis, p.
In part, this is a fantastic capability, because it's a real step in heading off chronic illness and its subsequent debilitation and expense.
Because menopause comes at a time when many other negative factors converge in a woman's life, the change is often misidentified as the cause of physical and mental debilitation rather than as a coincidental occurrence.
More people are going to need new organs because of debilitation from HIV and the drugs used to treat HIV, and there is no system in place to deal with what's going to be coming down.