death instinct


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instinct

 [in´stinkt]
a complex of unlearned responses characteristic of a species. adj., adj instinc´tive.
death instinct Freud's concept of an unconscious drive toward dissolution and death, in opposition to the life instinct.
herd instinct the instinct or urge to be one of a group and to conform to its standards of conduct and opinion.
life instinct Freud's concept of all the constructive tendencies of the organism aimed at maintenance and perpetuation of the individual and species, in opposition to the death instinct.

death in·stinct

an instinct of living creatures toward self-destruction, death, or a return to the inorganic lifelessness from which they arose.
Synonym(s): aggressive instinct

death instinct

n.
A primitive impulse for destruction, decay, and death, postulated by Sigmund Freud as coexisting with and opposing the life instinct. Also called Thanatos.

death instinct

instinctive behavior that tends to be self-destructive.

death in·stinct

(deth in'stingkt)
The instinct of all living creatures toward self-destruction, death, or a return to the inorganic lifelessness from which they arose.
References in periodicals archive ?
Freud's association of romantic love with the death instinct opens the door to a number of other strange but revealing connections in our depths.
Things come to an end when there is no longer any hope or faith, when the life force surrenders to the death instinct," Henry Miller wrote in the 1940 edition of The World of Sex.
But actually, the convergence of the two thinkers is still more interesting because in Freud's conception the death instinct is inextricably linked to the problem of repetition compulsion.
Similarly, Deleuze sees the death instinct as a possible escape from regressive and neurotic repetitions, while Freud sees regression and neurosis as its symptoms.
From death instinct to attachment theory; the primacy of the child in Freud, Klein and Hermann.
He walks the listener briskly through the life and evolving ideas of Freud, using, with definitions, the vocabulary that has insinuated itself into the popular lexicon: id, ego, and superego: narcissism, aggression, repression, paranoia, free association, transference and countertransference; unconscious and subconscious; sex, the death instinct, and dream interpretation.
Conversely, the death instinct originates with the birth of the human being and is an integral part of development, as has been pointed out by Freud (1926) and Klein (1945).