death anxiety


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death anxiety

The apprehension, worry, or fear related to death or dying.
See also: anxiety
References in periodicals archive ?
IRAP D scores were not correlated with age or self-reported depression, hopelessness, psychological flexibility, belief in the afterlife, or death anxiety (see Table 4), with one exception: death anxiety and the "others-life" trial type (p<.
Fear of death is a more specific, external threat, whereas death anxiety is used to define a more generic and nonspecific distress (3).
Caregivers who experience death anxiety have anxious thoughts or feelings when thinking about or talking about death and/or the dying process, or when interacting with someone who is dying (Lehto & Stein, 2009; Mallet, Jurs, Price, & Slenker, 1991; Tomer, 1994).
There were studies of death anxiety in Iranian nurses for example [13-16], one study of reasons for fearing death using Reasons for Death Fear Scale (RDFS), one study of death concern and death obsession using Death Concerns Scale (DCS), and Death Obsession Scale (DOS) in Iranian nurses [17-18], but there has been no study using the Death Depression Scale (DDS) in Iran amongst nurses.
The aim of the present study was to validate the Death Anxiety Scale, in its Spanish version in order to establish both its validity and application and scoring criteria.
We maintain that by approaching the Babel narrative from this alternative perspective, elemental developmental dynamics of the individuation/separation process comes into full relief, offering the discerning reader of the Bible a psychologically sophisticated etiology for and solution to the universal condition of death anxiety.
Objectives: To investigate the perception of social support and death anxiety among patients having chronic diseases like Cancer, Hepatitis, Cardiovascular disease and diabetes.
As a result, the current study will examine parental perceptions of children's emotional and physical reactions to explanations of death, as well as parental death anxiety and afterlife beliefs.
Research addressed a wide array of issues including the causes, correlates, and outcomes of death anxiety, responses to life threatening illness, dynamics of grief and bereavement, risk-taking behavior, and suicide and involved diverse populations in terms of age, gender, ethnicity, occupation, personality variables, and health status, etc.
In relation to the five factors of social axioms, a stronger religious belief and a weaker belief in fate control were associated with less anxiety about death, and belief in fate control partially mediated the relationship between death ideation and death anxiety (Hui, Bond, & Ng, 2006).
Two major streams of research were heavily influential in the origination of this project, the first dealing with death anxiety as a psychological state, and the second with death anxiety as a personality trait / individual difference.
Self-esteem is a great buffer against death anxiety.