death anxiety


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death anxiety

The apprehension, worry, or fear related to death or dying.
See also: anxiety
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, why was there no difference in death anxiety scores between counselors who had worked with clients who died and those who did not?
Both sets of analyses focused on the relationship between the predictor variables of death anxiety, level of sensation-seeking, perceived physical self-efficacy, locus of control, social-complexity, self-presentational style, socioeconomic status, and gender and the criterion variable of degree of involvement in high-risk recreation (see Table 2 for means and standard deviations for ali participants, high-risk recreation participants, and high-risk recreation nonparticipants).
Depression, anxiety and death anxiety are common in elders [4].
In both cases, symbolic or purely altruistic acts have the psychological effect of restoring a sense of justice, fulfilling a protective function, or acting as a coping mechanism against death anxiety.
Spirituality and religiosity: Relative relationships to death anxiety.
IAT D scores were not correlated with age, depression, hopelessness, psychological flexibility, belief in the afterlife, or death anxiety (all ps> .
Also there is statistically significant correlation between death anxiety and death depression [24].
According to Firestone (2001), one's awareness of death anxiety positively correlates to the degree of individuation and differentiation the self is capable of experiencing, explaining how "the fear of being cut off from others, alone and isolated from ones fellows .
Thus, strong Incarnational images are resisted, particularly by persons with heightened death anxiety or by believers who have adopted faith configurations apparently aimed at managing existential anxieties.
The authors compared the effects of forgiveness by others and by God on death anxiety.
This existential position may result in an unconscious death urge, or in death anxiety and the microsuicidal behaviors (Firestone, 1985, 1987) that many people use to defend against that anxiety (e.