deafferentation

(redirected from deafferented)

de·af·fer·en·ta·tion

(dē-af'ĕr-en-tā'shŭn),
A loss of the sensory input from a portion of the body, usually caused by interruption of the peripheral sensory fibers.
[L. de, from, + afferent]

deafferentation

/de·af·fer·en·ta·tion/ (de-af″er-en-ta´shun) the elimination or interruption of sensory nerve fibers.

deafferentation

[dē·af′ərəntā′shən]
Etymology: L, de, from, ad + ferre, to bear
the elimination or interruption of afferent nerve impulses.

de·af·fer·en·ta·tion

(dē-af'ĕr-ĕn-tā'shŭn)
A loss of the sensory input from a portion of the body, usually caused by interruption of the peripheral sensory fibers.
[L. de, from, + afferent]

de·af·fer·en·ta·tion

(dē-af'ĕr-ĕn-tā'shŭn)
Loss of sensory input from portion of the body.
[L. de, from, + afferent]
References in periodicals archive ?
Body image and body schema in a deafferented subject.
On the contrary, this paper argues that the contrast between the character of afferented and deafferented agency shows that bodily awareness is crucial to explaining the distinctive character of bodily action in neurologically normal agents.
In the second part of the project we will use visual imagery to ""access"" the deafferented or lesioned visual cortex.
In this group the pain is likely due to increased spontaneous activity in deafferented central neurons and/or reorganization of central connections.
The approach is derived directly from an extensive program of basic research with deafferented monkeys conducted by Taub (reviewed in Taub [32-33]).
Chronically deafferented sensory cortex recovers a grossly typical organization after allogenic hand transplantation.
For years they conducted studies on primates with deafferented limbs and observed that the monkeys regained use of the arm when the unaffected upper extremity was restrained.
Auditory compensation in persons who are blind is due to the recruitment of the deafferented sensory (visual) areas; in the case of low vision, these areas are still (although marginally) stimulated by their normal afferences; thus, plasticity phenomena are reduced (Lessard et al.
who is a deafferented patient with a complete loss of sense of movement and postural changes.
Similarly, deafferented monkeys can bring the hand to visually designated locations even when they cannot see, hear, or feel the hand (Pout & Bizzi, 1978).
A specific rationale for including this task is also provided by recent neurological research with deafferented patients using analogous procedures (e.