deadly nightshade


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bel·la·don·na

(bel'ă-don'ă),
Atropa belladonna (family Solanaceae); a perennial herb with dark or yellow purple flowers and shining purplish-black berries; the leaves (0.3% belladonna alkaloids) and root (0.5% belladonna alkaloids) orginally were sources of atropine scopalamine and related alkaloids, which are anticholinergic. Belladonna is used as a powder (0.3% belladonna alkaloids, calculated as hyoscyamine) and tincture in the treatment of diarrhea, asthma, colic, and hyperacidity.
Synonym(s): deadly nightshade
[It. bella, beautiful, + donna, lady]

belladonna

Drug slang
A regional term for phencyclidine (PCP).
 
Herbal medicine
A perennial herb which is highly toxic if taken internally at full concentration; belladonna contains scopolamine and hyoscyamine, which are used as antispasmodics in mainstream medicine and for gout and rheumatism in herbal medicine.
 
Toxicity
Belladonna causes diarrhoea, dilated pupils, dry mouth, flushing, hallucinations, hypertension, incoordination, nausea, speech impairment, tachycardia, vision impairment, vomiting, coma, possibly death.

Homeopathy B
elladonna is used for conditions of abrupt onset, acute infections, cough, earache, fever, headaches, seizures, sore throat, teething in children, urinary tract infections.

Ophthalmology
Belladonna derivatives—e.g., homatropine eye drops—are instilled into the eye to dilate the pupil

bel·la·don·na

(bel'ă-don'ă)
Atropa belladonna; a perennial herb with dark purple flowers and berries. Originally used as a source of atropine.
Synonym(s): deadly nightshade.
[It. bella, beautiful, + donna, lady]

deadly nightshade

The source of the drug BELLADONNA.

deadly nightshade

Atropa belladonna. Commonly confused with Solanum spp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna) intoxication: An analysis of 49 children.
The black berries of the deadly nightshade are pointed out to children as something not to eat.
This erroneous belief may have stemmed from tomatoes belonging to the Solanaceae or deadly nightshade family, which also includes eggplant, peppers and potatoes.
The berries of the deadly nightshade plant caused a rapid, but painful death.
You will get some plants you may not want, like deadly nightshade, poison ivy, pokeberry or Russian olive, which will take over everything.
From the deadly nightshade comes atropin, a drug important in ophthamology, and derived from the foxglove plant is digitoxin, or digitalis, the necessary ingredient in several heart medications.
Deadly Nightshade came out in 1940; Murder in Volume 2 in 1941; and Wrong Way Down in 1946.
weight " Foods from the deadly nightshade family - potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and aubergines - contain alkaloids, which have been shown to inhibit the repair of collagen in those with arthritis and help to create inflammation and pain.
Also, foods from the deadly nightshade family (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and aubergines) contain alkaloids, which have been shown to inhibit the repair of collagen in those with arthritis and will help to create inflammation and therefore pain.
Some, such as the common foxglove, may seem innocuous while others, like Atropa belladonna (deadly nightshade), always come with Deadly nightshade a skull and crossbone warning.
A Foxglove B Deadly nightshade C Jack-in-the-pulpit D Lords and ladies QUESTION 5 - for 5 points: Which musical featured rival gangs named The Jets and The Sharks?
Deadly nightshade (black berries), climbing nightshade (red or black berries), poison ivy and poison sumac (white berries) and plants like baneberry, doll's eyes, leopardsbane and a host of unfamiliar plants are best admired at a distance.