deadly nightshade


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bel·la·don·na

(bel'ă-don'ă),
Atropa belladonna (family Solanaceae); a perennial herb with dark or yellow purple flowers and shining purplish-black berries; the leaves (0.3% belladonna alkaloids) and root (0.5% belladonna alkaloids) orginally were sources of atropine scopalamine and related alkaloids, which are anticholinergic. Belladonna is used as a powder (0.3% belladonna alkaloids, calculated as hyoscyamine) and tincture in the treatment of diarrhea, asthma, colic, and hyperacidity.
Synonym(s): deadly nightshade
[It. bella, beautiful, + donna, lady]

belladonna

Drug slang
A regional term for phencyclidine (PCP).
 
Herbal medicine
A perennial herb which is highly toxic if taken internally at full concentration; belladonna contains scopolamine and hyoscyamine, which are used as antispasmodics in mainstream medicine and for gout and rheumatism in herbal medicine.
 
Toxicity
Belladonna causes diarrhoea, dilated pupils, dry mouth, flushing, hallucinations, hypertension, incoordination, nausea, speech impairment, tachycardia, vision impairment, vomiting, coma, possibly death.

Homeopathy B
elladonna is used for conditions of abrupt onset, acute infections, cough, earache, fever, headaches, seizures, sore throat, teething in children, urinary tract infections.

Ophthalmology
Belladonna derivatives—e.g., homatropine eye drops—are instilled into the eye to dilate the pupil

bel·la·don·na

(bel'ă-don'ă)
Atropa belladonna; a perennial herb with dark purple flowers and berries. Originally used as a source of atropine.
Synonym(s): deadly nightshade.
[It. bella, beautiful, + donna, lady]

deadly nightshade

The source of the drug BELLADONNA.

deadly nightshade

Atropa belladonna. Commonly confused with Solanum spp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Cleopatra decided against using deadly nightshade for her earthly exit, her experiments with the poison revealed one of its most interesting properties.
The officer said another message from the defendant to the witness read: "Should just slip deadly nightshade or foxglove into her Ribena.
KILLERS - Above, Deadly Nightshade and below, Monkshood EXPERT - The Duchess of Northumberland in the Poison Garden at Alnwick
It looked like the deadly nightshade that grows along the streams in Cache Valley, but was different in two very distinct ways: crushed leaves did not stink, and the berries covered entire stems.
Moderately toxic: Azalea, black locust, Chinese lantern, Christmas cherry, stinging nettles, St John's Wort, deadly nightshade, dumb cane, ergot, horsetail, horse chestnut, larkspur, lupine, rhododendron and rhubarb leaves.
Scientists discovered the remnants of a brew in a Neolithic pot in the Orkneys: it contained henbane, hemlock and deadly nightshade, ingredients that could kill but which in beer would produce mind-altering hallucinatory effects.
Agutter, 52, terrorised Scotland in 1994 when he laced bottles of tonic water in his local Safeway store in Edinburgh with atropine, a derivative of Deadly Nightshade.
Poisonous ornamental nightshades include tree datura or angel's trumpet (Brugmansia), Jerusalem cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum), night-blooming jasmine (Cestrum nocturnum) and deadly nightshade or belladonna (Atropa belladonna).
Belladonna, the juice of the deadly nightshade, is taken to bring relief from headaches and high temperatures.
Today, deadly nightshade serves as the source of the pupil-dilating drug atropine.
Why, for instance, is the deadly nightshade depiction quite as light-hearted as it is?
THE boy accused of murdering a 15-year-old in a South Wales woods sent a friend a message suggesting he was going to poison her with foxglove or deadly nightshade, a court heard yesterday.