dead space


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dead space

 
1. a space remaining in the tissues as a result of failure of proper closure of surgical or other wounds, permitting the accumulation of blood or serum.
2. the portions of the respiratory tract that are ventilated but not perfused by pulmonary circulation.
alveolar dead space the difference between anatomical dead space and physiologic dead space, representing the space in alveoli occupied by air that does not participate in oxygen–carbon dioxide exchange (alveolar ventilation). It varies in different parts of the lungs and under different conditions.
anatomical dead space the airways of the mouth, nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles.
equipment dead space the volume of equipment that results in rebreathing of gases.
physiologic dead space the sum of the anatomic and alveolar dead spaces; its volume (VD) is determined by measuring the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in a sample of exhaled gas (PECO2) and in the arterial blood (PaCO2) and (with tidal volume of VT) using the formula VD/VT = (PaCO2−PECO2)/PaCO2.

dead space

1. a cavity, potential or real, remaining after the closure of a wound that is not obliterated by the operative technique;
2.

dead space

Etymology: AS, dead; L, spatium
1 a cavity that remains after the incomplete closure of a surgical or traumatic wound, leaving an area in which blood can collect and delay healing.
2 the amount of lung in contact with ventilating gases but not in contact with pulmonary blood flow. Alveolar dead space is characterized by alveoli that are ventilated by the pulmonary circulation but are not perfused. The condition may exist when pulmonary circulation is obstructed, as by a thromboembolus. Anatomical dead space is an area in the trachea, bronchi, and air passages containing air that does not reach the alveoli during respiration. As a general rule, the volume of air in the anatomical dead space in milliliters is approximately equal to the weight in pounds of the individual affected. Certain lung disorders, such as emphysema, increase the amount of anatomical dead space. Physiological dead space is an area in the respiratory system that includes the anatomical dead space together with the space in the alveoli occupied by air that does not contribute to the oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange.
Physiology All non-air exchanging spaces of the upper respiratory tract; there are ± 2.0 ml of ‘dead space’/kg body weight—i.e., a 70-kg person has 140–150 ml of dead space in the oronasopharynx, bronchi, and bronchioles
Therapeutics That part of a syringe’s tip and needle that contains medication that cannot be administered; dead space is very important in insulin therapy, and for drugs in which the syringe has < 0.5 mL capacity

dead space

Clinical therapeutics That part of a syringe's tip and needle that contains medication that can't be administered; DS is very important in insulin therapy, and for medications where the syringe has < 0.5 mL capacity

dead space

(ded spās)
A cavity, potential or real, remaining after the closure of a wound that is not obliterated by the operative technique.
See: anatomic dead space, physiologic dead space

dead space

the air in trachea, bronchi and bronchioles that does not take part in gaseous exchange. Of each breath of 500 cm3, only about half of the air reaches the alveoli.

dead space

in human anatomy and physiology, refers to the respiratory passages (airways) leading to the alveoli of the lungs, so named because the air breathed in and out of this space does not reach the alveoli and so takes no part in gas exchange with the blood; dead space ventilation the volume of gas breathed in and out of the dead space per minute, normally about one-third of the total ventilation (minute volume) at rest, becoming a smaller fraction as tidal volume increases in exercise.

dead space

(ded spās)
A cavity, potential or real, remaining after the closure of a wound that is not obliterated by the operative technique.

dead space,

space

1. a delimited area.
2. an actual or potential cavity of the body.
3. the areas of the universe beyond the earth and its atmosphere.

dead space
1. space remaining in tissues as a result of failure of proper closure of surgical or other wounds, permitting accumulation of blood or serum.
2. the portions of the respiratory tract (passages and space in the alveoli) occupied by gas not concurrently participating in oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange.
Enlarge picture
Types of dead-space in an anesthetic ventilation system. By permission from Cunningham JG, Textbook of Veterinary Physiology, Saunders, 2002
Disse s's
small spaces between liver sinusoids and liver cells; conduits for liver lymph. Called also perisinusoidal space.
epidural space
the space between the dura mater and the lining of the spinal canal.
s's of Fontana
fluid spaces separating solid trabeculae in the iridial angle meshwork.
interalveolar space
the part of the dental arch where there are no teeth.
intercostal space
the space between two adjacent ribs.
interpleural space
mediastinum.
intervillous space
the space of the human and some other placentae into which the chorionic villi project and through which the maternal blood circulates.
lumbosacral space
the intervertebral space between the last lumbar and the first sacral vertebrae; suitable site for epidural injection.
lymph s's
open spaces filled with lymph in connective or other tissue, especially in the brain and meninges.
Meckel's space
a recess in the dura mater that lodges the trigeminal ganglion.
mediastinal space
mediastinum.
medullary space
the central cavity and the intervals between the trabeculae of bone that contain the marrow.
parasinoidal s's
spaces in the dura mater along the superior sagittal sinus which receive the venous blood.
perisinusoidal space
see Disse spaces (above).
perivascular space
a lymph space within the walls of an artery.
plantar space
a fascial space on the sole of the foot of primates, divided by septa into the lateral, middle and median plantar spaces.
pneumatic space
a portion of bone occupied by air-containing cells, especially the spaces constituting the paranasal sinuses.
retroperitoneal space
the space between the peritoneum and the dorsal abdominal wall.
retropharyngeal space
the space behind the pharynx, containing areolar tissue.
subarachnoid space
the space between the arachnoid and the pia mater, containing cerebrospinal fluid.
subdural space
the space between the dura mater and the arachnoid.
subphrenic space
the space between the diaphragm and subjacent organs of bipeds.
subumbilical space
somewhat triangular space in the body cavity cranial to the umbilicus.
Tenon's space
a lymph space between the sclera and Tenon's capsule.
References in periodicals archive ?
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