de-lead

de-lead

 [de-led´]
to induce the removal of lead from tissues and its excretion in the urine by the administration of chelating agents.

de-lead

(dē-led'),
To mobilize and excrete lead deposited in bones and other tissues, as by the administration of a chelating agent.

de-lead

(-led´) to induce the removal of lead from tissues and its excretion in the urine by the administration of chelating agents.

de-lead

(dē-led')
To cause the mobilization and excretion of lead deposited in the bones and other tissues, as by the administration of a chelating agent.

delead, de-lead

to induce the removal of lead from tissues and its excretion in the urine by the administration of chelating agents.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Public health officials have spent the last half-century trying to de-lead our society, especially because children are so vulnerable to lead's effects on the developing brain.
One of the great pieces of misinformation widely circulated is that the best way to de-lead a bore is to shoot a couple of jacketed bullets through it.
It would require owners to de-lead their apartments, not only where there is flaking, but where there is intact paint.
Families can also pressure landlords to de-lead their properties, since under state law they cannot evict or refuse to rent to anyone because of lead paint.
It typically costs a landlord about $6,000 to $8,000 to de-lead one housing unit.
a goal to de-lead 200 housing units in the city over the next three years at a cost of roughly $1.
If the landlords are in the rental business and can't afford to de-lead, they shouldn't be in the rental business.
Seney was given two months to de-lead the interior rooms of the eight-unit dwelling and add a buzzer to the entryway door before the city would begin imposing a $1,000-a-day fine.