file

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file

 [fīl]
a collection of records, which may constitute a database or be a component of one.
digital file a patient record or part of a record that has been converted to a format that can be transmitted or viewed on a computer.

file

(fīl),
A tool for smoothing, grinding, or cutting.

file

1 (in dentistry) a tool for scaling or removing plaque and calcified deposits from the teeth, or in the preparation of the root canal during endodontic therapy.
2 a collection of related data or information, assembled for a specified purpose and stored as a unit.

file

noun A basic unit of storage on a computer; a collection of data which can be stored, accessed and transferred as a single unit. A file may contain text, calculations, graphics or software routines.
 
verb To store information.

file

Informatics noun A basic unit of storage on a computer; a collection of data that can be stored, accessed, and transferred as a single unit; a file may contain text, calculations, graphics, or software routines. See Client-user options file, Corrupted file, RSV file verb To store information.

file

(fīl)
Dental instrument used to crush large calculus deposits and to smooth, grind, and cut. Its working-end has several cutting edges.

file,

n 1. a metal tool of varying size and form with numerous ridges or teeth on its cutting surfaces; may be push-cut or pull-cut; used for smoothing or dressing down metals and other substances.
2. a collection of records; an organized collection of information directed toward some purpose such as patient demographic data. The records in a file may or may not be sequenced according to a key contained in each record.
v 3. to reduce by means of a file.
file, gold,
n a file designed for removing surplus gold from gold restorations; may be pull-cut or push-cut.
file, Hirschfeld-Dunlop,
n.pr a periodontal file used with a pull stroke for the removal of calculus; available in various angulations for approach to different surfaces of teeth.
file, periodontal,
n an instrument with multiple, angled cutting edges used to roughen the surface of a smooth calculus deposit before removal with a curet.
file, root canal,
n a small metal hand instrument with tightly spiraled blades used to clean and shape the canal.
file, sharpening,
n a difficult honing procedure requiring special tools designed to address the file's numerous parallel ridges.
References in periodicals archive ?
The simulation test program sends the data file from the server A to server B.
Inputting data into the meta-data database structure requires three tasks: creating the meta data records, renaming the data files and moving the data files from the local data computer to the centralized server.
In another example, such as an e-mail server for a global organization, where the availability of time to perform backup operations is extremely limited, a disk-based backup solution can provide for smaller backup windows, and also provide somewhat faster recovery of distinct data files.
GDT's street data files provide the most comprehensive U.
Given the hundreds of applications and the range of lifecycle parameters required for each, creating a process for classifying and tagging data files will be a daunting task.
Uncluttering hard disks by removing duplicate and unused programs and data files.
It is currently being used by the Navy and Marine Corps for the rapid distribution of mission data files.
Once those repairs are made, data files are restored from the D2D backup device to primary disk.
Losses can occur for several reasons: a computer "crash," which occurs when the hard disk drive that stores data malfunctions; the office is hit by an electrical blackout, corrupting data stored on the hard disk; an employee purposely or accidentally erases data; a fire or other disaster destroys the office; or a computer virus obliterates all the data files.
Often, the user loses weeks worth of work and is left without the applications and data files that they need to be productive for the rest of their trip.
On one hand, computer systems involve certain basic risks, such as the difficulty of detecting unauthorized changes to data files (although safeguards do exist).