darwinism


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darwinism

 [dar´wĭ-nizm]
the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

darwinism

/dar·win·ism/ (dahr´win-izm) the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

Darwinism

(där′wĭ-nĭz′əm)
n.
A theory of biological evolution developed by Charles Darwin and others, stating that all species of organisms have developed from other species, primarily through natural selection. Also called Darwinian theory.

Dar′win·ist n.
Dar′win·is′tic adj.

darwinism

The current paradigm of evolution, which holds that cumulative changes in successive generations of organisms—i.e., evolution of species—results from mutation and natural selection of the organisms that are best adapted phenotypically to survive in an environment—i.e., ‘survival of the fittest’

Darwinism

the theory of evolution formulated by Charles DARWIN that holds that different species of plants and animals have arisen by a process of slow and gradual changes over successive generations, brought about by NATURAL SELECTION. The essential points of Darwin's theory are:
  1. in organisms that reproduce sexually there is a wide range of variability, both within and between species.
  2. all living forms have the potential for a rapid rise in numbers, increasing at a geometric rate.
  3. the fact that populations usually remain within a limited size must indicate a ‘struggle for existence’ in which those individuals unsuited to the particular conditions operating at that time are eliminated or fail to breed as successfully as others (see FITNESS).
  4. the struggle for existence results in natural selection that favours the survival of the best-adapted individuals, a process described by Herbert Spencer (1820–93) in his Principles of Biology (1865) as the ‘survival of the fittest’.

darwinism

the theory of evolution according to which higher organisms have been developed from lower ones through the influence of natural selection.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Institute keeps asking for flaws--weaknesses and criticisms--of Darwinism and Darwinian theory to be presented in the textbooks, but the books already contain this information.
Nobody in the biological sciences, medicine included, needs Darwinism at all," added Leguizamon.
Along the way contributors touch briefly but competently on other specific topics such as miracles, social Darwinism, and some implications of sociobiology.
Commonsense Darwinism: Evolution, Morality, and the Human Condition" discusses Darwinism and where it conflicts with many existing beliefs such as religion, free will, and other factors.
In recent times, Stephen Gould impressed the public as the chief champion of Darwinism.
Spencer's ideas, known as "Social Darwinism," found a ready following among leading minds in the United States.
Just one such fossil would be enough to rock Darwinism to its physicists and cosmologists can trace the formation of the universe all the way back to the Big Bang, when matter and energy erupted into being.
The Church of England is also seeking to bring Darwinism back into the fold.
There will be a presentation about the collapse of Darwinism in the university on Feb.
Her current work, which is in a Victorian tank at the university's Dove Marine Laboratory, Cullercoats, is a John Ruskin quote about Darwinism.
Recognizing the possiblity of a fresh start, grounded on the foundations of the historical sciences, his ultimate hope is for literary Darwinism to contribute new knowledge.