Junco hyemalis

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Junco hyemalis

slate-colored junco; sparrow-shaped bird inhabiting west coast of North America.
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Low-amplitude songs produced by male Dark-eyed Juncos (Junco hyemalis) differ when sung during intra- and inter-sexual interactions.
In dark-eyed junco digestive tracts, Ambrosia (23%), Amaranthus (20%), Panicum (18%), and Parietaria (12%) made up almost three-fourths of the identifiable seeds.
This study reveals variation in the mean, co-variation, and dimorphism of wing length, tail length, and tail white among the Dark-eyed Junco subspecies.
We quantified female home-range size during the nestling period for Dark-eyed Juncos (Junco hyemalis) to examine if female home-range size declines between the fertile and nestling periods.
Species numbers and windows at which fatalities occurred were: one Black-capped Chickadee, two American Tree Sparrows, and five Dark-eyed Juncos at the clear glass control, and two American Tree Sparrows and one Dark-eyed Junco at CUV-O.
We found no window-killed birds in winter despite relatively abundant species (defined as >5 individuals/survey), such as American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos), American Robin, European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris), Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum), Dark-eyed Junco, Northern Cardinal, and House Sparrow (Passer domesticus).
Last December, while climbing in woods near Boston, Joslin shared the branches of a tall conifer with a flock of wintering dark-eyed juncos, small birds from Canada that roost high in the pine trees of Massachusetts in winter.
Hummingbirds cavort in her yard year-round, and on Saturday alone, she counted five mourning doves, two dark-eyed juncos, a white-crowned sparrow and two house finches.
Birds of particular note: a regularly nesting pair of red-shouldered hawks, dark-eyed juncos, pine warblers and bald eagles along the river in winter.
In dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis), individuals that were sired by a male other than their mother's pair-bonded partner grew up to have higher reproductive success than did individuals whose mother stayed faithful to her partner.
During periods of deep snow or icing, bird feeders can become of paramount importance to birds - particularly ground-feeders and seed-eaters such as dark-eyed juncos, cardinals, mourning doves and black-capped chickadees - because they quickly become some of the few feeding locations open, with the exception of plowed roads and driveways, waterways and spring seeps.