dandelion


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dandelion

/dan·de·li·on/ (dan´dĕ-li″on) a weedy herb, Taraxacum officinale, having deeply notched leaves and brilliant yellow flowers; used for dyspepsia, loss of appetite, urinary tract infections, and liver and gallbladder complaints.

dandelion

A perennial herb containing inulin, bitter principles and sesquiterpenes; the roots are rich in vitamins A and C. Chinese and Western herbalists use two different species for different indications.
 
Chinese herbal medicine
The entire plant has been used as an antidote, an anti-inflammatory, to dissolve blood clots, reduce swelling and promote internal secretions; dandelions have also been used for breast disease and poor lactation, colitis, food poisoning, hepatitis and other liver diseases, gallstones, kidney stones, ocular pain and swelling, snakebites, tuberculosis and urinary burning.

Flower essence therapy
An essence which is believed to provide dynamic energy and promote inner peace.
 
Herbal medicine
In Western herbal medicine, dandelion root is a diuretic, laxative and tonic, and has been used for poor digestion, gallbladder disease, hepatitis and other liver diseases, congestive heart failure, hypertension, menstrual pain, premenstrual syndrome and arthritic pain.

dandelion,

n Latin names:
Taraxacum officinale, Taraxacum laevigatum; parts used: buds, leaves, roots; uses: laxative, antihypertensive, diuretic, (under research: antitumor, immunogenic, colon disease, urolithiasis); precautions: pregnancy, lactation, those allergic to chamomile or yarrow root, patients with diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, stomach disorders, bile duct blockage, intestinal blockage, latex allergy; can cause nausea, cholelithiasis, gallbladder infection, contact dermatitis. Also called
blowball, cankerwort, lion's tooth, priest's crown, puffball, swine snout, white endive, and
wild endive.

dandelion

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The false dandelion has white petals and a yellow center with parachute-like seeds and hard-to-remove taproots, not to be confused with the dandelion whose colors are inverted.
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Rich in vitamins A and C, iron, potassium and zinc, dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) was used by Native Americans as a folk remedy for upset stomach, and liver, kidney and skin diseases.