dactylic


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dactylic

See dactyl.
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In Middleton's Women Beware Women heavy feminine and dactylic endings occur in 12 percent of all lines; e.
66) See Seppo Heikkinen, "Quae non habet intellectum: The Disappearance of Spondaic Fifth Feet from Dactylic Hexameter Verse," in Interfaces between Language and Culture in Medieval England: A Festschrift for Matti Kilpid, ed.
Here the objection might be that there is no separating sound from sense when it comes to the operations of language, as is suggested by Frost's coining of the phrase "the sound of sense" to refer, for example, to the speech contour of rising inflection that ends a question, or as in the case of the dactylic sloping of the Latinate word "copulate," as opposed to the monosyllabic slap of any of its Germanic synonyms.
This passage--its appeal to sound (luminous plume) and rhythm (not just dactylic but also trochaic and iambic), as well as its (almost) violation of the rules of syntax in the repetition of "up up up, on and on, down down and across" and "sky made vaster" marks this passage with the ludic play described by Barthes.
The dactylic pulses from "filament, filament, filament" augment throughout the poem.
This apparent kinship is reinforced by the fact that Horace wrote both of these groups of poems in the same meter, the dactylic hexameter.
Likewise, dactylic rhymes in Russian verse that have been very common since the mid-nineteenth century (Nekrasov, Fet, Bal'mont and others) find no correspondence in French, and to an even lesser degree do compound or polysyllabic rhymes, like those of Mayakovslcy.
It was difficult, because there were very few dactylic poems available as models.
Here again we encounter Cummings's hallmark dactylic tetrameter, made explicit in the first line, and visually in the layout of the poem on the page.
The epigram is composed in dactylic hexameters, which give it a mock-heroic tone and also a fluent narrative instead of the antithetical statements of the epigrammatic couplet.
Aristotle continues by observing that the dactylic hexameter constitutes a grand metre which is considered a suitable medium to represent the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (42).
One must question therefore whether a Roman critic of the late Republic, or even a lay reader, would have been willing to list poems written in dactylic hexameter and elegiac couplets under the same generic class.