direct current

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current

 [kur´ent]
1. something that flows.
2. specifically, electricity transmitted through a circuit.
alternating current a current that periodically flows in opposite directions; its amplitude fluctuates as a sine wave.
convection current a current caused by movement by convection of warmer fluid into an area of cooler fluid.
direct current a current that flows in one direction only; when modeled as a wave, its amplitude is constant. When used medically it is called galvanic current. This current has distinct and important polarity and marked secondary chemical effects.
galvanic current a steady direct current.
current of injury an electric current that flows between injured myocardium and normal myocardium, because such cells have a reduced membrane potential; it may be either diastolic or systolic.
current of injury, diastolic the current that flows from injured to noninjured tissue during electrical diastole.
current of injury, systolic the current that flows from healthy tissue to injured tissue during electrical systole.
inwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the interior of a cell.
leakage current the electrical current that exists in the parts or metal case of electrical equipment.
outwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the exterior of a cell.
potassium rectifying c's transmembrane currents that rectify inwardly or outwardly to make adjustments in cellular functions; they are mainly responsible for the repolarization phase of the action potential. There are at least six mechanisms by which potassium ions move across cardiac cell membranes in the role of rectifier.

di·rect cur·rent (DC),

a current that flows only in one direction, for example, that is derived from a battery; sometimes referred to as galvanic current.
See also: galvanism.

direct current (DC)

an electric current that flows in one direction only and is substantially constant in value. Compare alternating current.

direct current

A continuous electromagnetic current that flows in only one direction.

di·rect cur·rent

(DC) (di-rekt kŭrĕnt)
An electrical current that flows only in one direction; e.g., that derived from a battery; sometimes referred to as galvanic current.

di·rect cur·rent

(DC) (di-rekt kŭrĕnt)
An electrical current that flows only in one direction; also referred to as galvanic current.

current

that which flows; electric transmission in a circuit.

alternating current
a current that flows in opposite directions sinusoidally.
direct current
a current whose direction is always the same.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite claims from makers of a-c and brushless d-c drives, not all extruder manufacturers are ready to write off brush-type d-c systems.
He points to a recent trend among both a-c and d-c motor suppliers to reduce frame size - i.
expects brush-type d-c drives to continue to dominate extrusion because of their wide availability and cost-competitiveness.
The single source of large brushless d-c drives is apparently a concern of other extruder manufacturers as well.
Finally, John Malinowski, d-c product manager of Baldor, Fort Smith, Ark.
Brush-type d-c drives have an advantage in extrusion applications, he says, because they provide constant torque throughout the speed range required by the extruder.
He also minimizes some drawbacks in brush-type d-c motor repair.
Motors and controllers are interchangeable on brush-type d-c systems, which can make replacements of motors and drives easier.
PHOTO : Brushless d-c drives, now available up to 300 hp, are said to provide 0% speed error with digital phase locking, and have a speed range of 100:1.