cytoskeleton


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cytoskeleton

 [si″to-skel´ĕ-ton]
a conspicuous internal reinforcement in the cytoplasm of a cell, consisting of tonofibrils, filaments of the terminal web, and other microfilaments. adj., adj cytoskel´etal.

cy·to·skel·e·ton

(sī'tō-skel'ĕ-ton),
In cells, the microtubules and the filaments (thin, intermediate, and thick) that serve as supportive cytoplasmic elements to stiffen cells or to organize the location and movement of intracellular organelles.

cytoskeleton

/cy·to·skel·e·ton/ (-skel´it-on) a conspicuous internal reinforcement in the cytoplasm of a cell, consisting of tonofibrils, filaments of the terminal web, and other microfilaments.cytoskel´etal

cytoskeleton

(sī′tə-skĕl′ĭ-tn)
n.
The internal framework of a eukaryotic cell, composed of protein filaments that provide structural support and drive the movement of the cell and its internal components, typically divided into three categories (microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules) based on the diameter and composition of the filaments.

cy′to·skel′e·tal (-ĭ-tl) adj.

cytoskeleton

[-skel′ətən]
Etymology: Gk, kytos + skeletos, dried body
the cytoplasmic elements, including the tonofibrils, keratin, and other microfibrils, that function as a supportive system within a cell, especially an epithelial cell.

cy·to·skel·e·ton

(sī'tō-skel'ĕ-tŏn)
The tonofilaments, keratin, desmin, neurofilaments, or other intermediate filaments serving as supportive cytoplasmic elements to stiffen cells or to organize intracellular organelles.

cytoskeleton

A complex network of ACTIN filaments within the nucleated cell. Unlike the bony skeleton in vertebrates, this skeleton has contractile properties and can alter the shape, size and even movement, of the cell. The cytoskeleton is also concerned with the adhesion of adjacent cells.

cytoskeleton

a network of MICROTUBULES and MICROFILAMENTS in the cytoplasm of cells which is thought to give the cell its characteristic shape. The network enables the movement of specific organelles within the cytoplasm (as in vesicles produced by the GOLGI APPARATUS), and the production of general CYTOPLASMIC STREAMING.

cytoskeleton

network of keratinocyte-derived keratin filaments and desmosomal connections providing structural support to epidermal basal cell layer, and aiding epidermis/dermis adhesion

cy·to·skel·e·ton

(sī'tō-skel'ĕ-tŏn)
The tonofilaments, keratin, desmin, neurofilaments, or other intermediate filaments serving as supportive cytoplasmic elements to stiffen cells or to organize intracellular organelles.

cytoskeleton,

n the intracellular filaments that serve to support or stiffen cells.

cytoskeleton

a conspicuous internal reinforcement in the cytoplasm of a cell, consisting of tonofibrils, filaments of the terminal web, and other microfilaments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the four cytoskeleton proteins in the USL that we verified, the expression of transgelin exhibited a "noteworthy" low expression level in patients (the expression level was 2.
Reoeganization of actin cytoskeleton of nuclear erythrocytes and leukocytes in fish, frogs and birds during migration.
The taxanes and vinca alkaloids target that part of the cytoskeleton known as microtubules.
We found an entire signaling pathway in the human host cell that the parasite engages, starting from a G-protein-coupled receptor, that the parasite uses to dismantle the cytoskeleton of the host cell, causing it to collapse," Greenbaum, study leader from the Pharmacology at Penn, said.
Because there was no effect on the actin cytoskeleton in this case, the downstream target of Rho kinase is mostly likely myosin II.
The cytoskeleton with the membrane skeleton surrounds and supports the contractile apparatus and forms an association with the plasmalemma.
Z-Fish[TM] cytoskeleton antibodies include anti-actin, -smooth muscle, anti--actin, raised with peptide antigens either from the C or N-terminus of the protein, anti-keratin, and b-Catenin, an actin related product.
Investigate three questions of fundamental importance: i) the potential transmission and function of mechanical forces from the cytoskeleton to chromatin during interphase, ii) the physical principles that govern chromosome reorganization under mechanical force in vitro, and iii) the global chromatin dynamics during the fundamental%s phase and its impact on genome stability.
The present work suggests that the bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in this process.
Scientists, including cell biologist Alexander Bershadsky at the National University of Singapore, had amassed evidence that the cytoskeleton enabled cells to distinguish right from left.
The release is aided by the cell's inner structural proteins called the cytoskeleton, along with contracting protein machinery called actomyosin.
TJ are complex protein structures comprised of transmembrane proteins, which interact with the actin cytoskeleton via plaque proteins.