cytotechnologist

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cytotechnologist

 [si″to-tek-nol´o-jist] (pl. cy·to·tech·nol·o·gist)
a clinical laboratory scientist specializing in cytology. Certification is through the Board of Registry of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists, whose address is P.O. Box 12270, Chicago, IL 60612 (telephone 312-738-1336). The address of the American Society of Cytopathology is 400 W. 9th St., Wilmington, DE 19801 (telephone 302-429-8802).

cy·to·tech·nol·o·gist

(sī'tō-tek-nol'ŏ-jist),
A person with special training in cytopathology who is responsible for screening Papanicolaou (Pap) smears and determining which are test negative and which require further review by a pathologist.
See also: Pap smear, Pap test.
Synonym(s): cytoscreener

cytotechnologist

(sī′tə-tĕk-nŏl′ə-jĭst)
n.
A technician trained in medical examination and identification of cellular abnormalities.

cy′to·tech·nol′o·gy n.

cytotechnologist

an allied health professional who works with a pathologist to detect changes in body cells that may be important in early diagnosis of cancer and other diseases. The cytotechnologist prepares cellular samples and examines them under a microscope to evaluate for abnormalities in structure.

cy·to·tech·nol·o·gist

(sī'tō-tek-nol'ŏ-jist)
A person with special training in cytopathology who is responsible for screening Papanicolaou smears and determining which results are negative and which require further review by a pathologist.
See also: Papanicolaou (Pap) smear, Papanicolaou (Pap) test
Synonym(s): cytoscreener.

cytotechnologist

a medical laboratory technologist specializing in cytology.
References in periodicals archive ?
It takes two years to train a cytoscreener and it is difficult to attract people to a job which never receives public praise for achievement which is poorly paid, highly responsible and stressful.
Mr Faulks said cytoscreeners who initially look at the smear tests, and others involved in screening "want the public to know that it is not infallible".
The judge paid tribute to cytoscreeners, who "do a difficult job under sometimes testing circumstances".