inclusion bodies

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in·clu·sion bod·ies

distinctive structures frequently formed in the nucleus or cytoplasm (occasionally in both locations) in cells infected with certain filtrable viruses; may be demonstrated by means of various stains, especially Mann eosin methylene blue or Giemsa techniques and visible by light microscopy. Nuclear inclusion bodies are usually acidophilic and are of two morphologic types: 1) granular, hyaline, or amorphous bodies of various sizes, that is, Cowdry type A inclusion bodies, occurring in such diseases as herpes simplex infection or yellow fever; 2) more circumscribed bodies, frequently with several in the same nucleus (and no reaction in adjacent tissue), that is, the type B bodies, occurring in such diseases as Rift Valley fever and poliomyelitis. Cytoplasmic inclusion bodies may be: 1) acidophilic, relatively large, spheric or ovoid, and somewhat granular, as in variola or vaccinia, rabies, and molluscum contagiosum; 2) basophilic, relatively large, complex combinations of viral and cellular material, as in trachoma, psittacosis, and lymphogranuloma venereum. In some instances, inclusion bodies are known to be infective and probably represent aggregates of virus particles in combination with cellular material, whereas others are apparently not infective and may represent only abnormal products formed by the cell in response to injury.

inclusion bodies

normal or abnormal objects of various shapes and sizes observed in the nucleus or cytoplasm of blood cells or other tissue cells.

in·clu·sion bod·ies

(in-klū'zhŭn bod'ēz)
Distinctive structures frequently formed in the nucleus or cytoplasm (occasionally in both locations) in cells infected with various filterable viruses; observed especially in nerve, epithelial, or endothelial cells.

inclusion bodies

Microscopically visible masses of virus material, or areas of altered staining behaviour, seen within cells in a number of virus infections such as RABIES, herpes infections, papovavirus infections and adenovirus infections.
References in periodicals archive ?
6] When examined by electron microscopy, the cells contain multilamellar cytoplasmic inclusion bodies typical of those found in type II alveolar epithelial cells of the lung.
Cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were seen within esophageal epithelial cells in five birds and in epithelial cells of the bronchioli in four penguins.
Langerhans cells have cytoplasmic inclusion bodies known as Birbeck granules; a definitive diagnosis requires electron microscopy of Birbeck granules or CD 1 antigenic determinants by immunohistochemistry.

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