cytomegaly

cytomegaly

 [si″to-meg´ah-le]
abnormal enlargement of a cell or group of cells.
adrenocortical cytomegaly abnormal enlargement of cells in the outer layer of the adrenal cortex.

cytomegaly

[cītōmeg′älē]
abnormal enlargement of a cell or group of cells.
Cytology A general term for markedly enlarged cells seen on cervical smears which may be mono-, bi- or multinucleated; the nuclei may be dyskeratotic
Pathology A nonspecific term for a cell with abundant clear cytoplasm, which may be benign or malignant and may be of any embryologic origin and may contain any histologically clear material
Examples Carcinoid cells, ependymal cells (myxopapillary ependymoma, hepatocytes), ballooning degeneration, histiocytes storing glycosaminoglycans and mucopoly-saccharides, neurons (Farber’s disease, lipogranulomatosis, mannosidosis) and pigmented cells either benign (balloon cell nevus) or malignant (balloon cell melanoma)

cytomegaly

unique and marked enlargement of cells; a characteristic of cytomegaloviruses; occurs also in cells infected with one strain of an ovine adenovirus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of the 3 Most-Common Viral Inclusion Bodies Seen in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Gastrointestinal Opportunistic Infections Cytomegalovirus Herpes Simplex Virus Cell type Endothelium, stromal, Epithelium (squamous, epithelium (glandular), less often glandular) macrophage Nucleus Nucleomegaly, eosinophilic Syncytial change, inclusion with surrounding homogenous eosinophilic halo/"owl-eye" "ground-glass" or Cowdry type-A inclusion Cytoplasm Cytomegaly, granular No inclusion basophilic inclusion bodies Adenovirus Cell type Epithelium (surface columnar, goblet cell) Nucleus Nucleomegaly, basophilic "smudged" inclusion Cytoplasm No inclusion
Adverse events were hematotoxicity and grade 3/4 cytomegaly virus (CMV) infection (16%); however, the response duration following alemtuzumab is usually limited, making the search for effective first-line consolidation mandatory.
Infections Pancreatitis accompanying viral infections (mumps, hepatitis B, cytomegaly, varicella zoster, herpes simplex, echo and coxsackie virus) is usually mild and self-limited.
The mesothelial cell hyperplasia was characterized by basophilia, cytomegaly, and loss of normal simple squamous architecture of the serosa.