cytomegalic inclusion disease


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Related to cytomegalic inclusion disease: salivary gland inclusion disease

cytomegalic inclusion disease

 [si″to-meg´ah-lik in-kloo´zhun]
any of a group of diseases caused by cytomegalovirus infection, marked by characteristic inclusion bodies in enlarged infected cells. In the fetus and infant, infection can be acquired in utero from the mother, transmitted from mother to infant in passage through the birth canal, or transmitted in the mother's milk. Most infected infants are asymptomatic, but in some there may be hepatosplenomegaly, jaundice, chorioretinitis, purpura, microcephaly, cerebral calcifications, and severe central nervous system sequelae with blindness, deafness, quadriplegia, and mental retardation. Acquired disease is transmitted via respiratory droplets, tissue or blood donation, or sexual transmission. Another acquired infection is cytomegalovirus mononucleosis. In immunocompromised patients there may be a disseminated, sometimes fatal, infection as well as specific syndromes such as cytomegalovirus pneumonia or cytomegalovirus retinitis.

cy·to·meg·a·lic in·clu·sion dis·ease

caused by cytomegalovirus, a member of the Herpesviridae family; the presence of inclusion bodies within the cytoplasm and nuclei of enlarged cells of various organs of newborn infants dying with jaundice, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, purpura, thrombocytopenia, and fever; the condition also occurs, at all ages, as a complication of other diseases in which immune mechanisms are severely depressed, and has been found incidentally in salivary gland epithelium, apparently as a localized or mild infection (salivary gland virus disease).

cytomegalic inclusion disease (CID)

Etymology: Gk, kytos + megas, large; L, in, claudere, in enclosure
a viral infection caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV), a member of the herpesvirus family. It is characterized by malaise, fever, lymphadenopathy, pneumonia, hepatosplenomegaly, and superinfection with various bacteria and fungi as a result of the depression of immune response characteristic of herpesviruses. It is primarily a congenitally acquired disease of newborns, transmitted in utero. Results may range from spontaneous abortion or fatal neonatal illness to birth of a normal infant, depending on such factors as the virulence of the viral strain, fetal age when infected, and primary or recurrent nature of the mother's infection. About 10% of newborns with congenital CMV show clinical signs, such as microcephaly, retarded growth, hepatosplenomegaly, hemolytic anemia, and pathological fracture of long bones. In 5% to 25% of asymptomatic infections, infants develop significant psychomotor, hearing, ocular, or dental abnormalities. Good hygiene is recommended to avoid transmission. Women who work with young children and are pregnant or planning to become pregnant are at high risk, especially if their first CMV infection is acquired during pregnancy. There is no specific treatment. Antiviral drugs such as ganciclovir and acyclovir are used in immunocompromised patients to prevent infection or reduce viral load in infected patients. See also TORCH syndrome.

cytomegalic inclusion disease

A viral infection of newborns and immunocompromised adults.
 
Clinical findings
In utero infection leads to spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, or congenital defects; opportunistic CID in immunocompromised hosts may cause fever, hepatosplenomegaly.
 
Sequelae
Mental retardation.

cytomegalic inclusion disease

Infectious disease A viral infection illness of newborns and immunocompromised adults Clinical In utero infection leads to spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, or congenital defects; opportunistic CID in immunocompromised hosts may cause fever, hepatosplenomegaly

cy·to·meg·a·lic in·clu·sion dis·ease

(sī'tō-mě-gā'lik in-klū'zhŭn di-zēz')
The presence of inclusion bodies within the cytoplasm and nuclei of enlarged cells of various organs of newborn infants dying because of jaundice, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, purpura, thrombocytopenia, and fever; the condition also occurs, at all ages, as a complication of other diseases in which immune mechanisms are severely depressed and has been found incidentally in salivary gland epithelium, apparently as a localized or mild infection (salivary gland virus disease).
Synonym(s): inclusion body disease.

cy·to·meg·a·lic in·clu·sion dis·ease

(sī'tō-mě-gā'lik in-klū'zhŭn di-zēz')
The presence of inclusion bodies within the cytoplasm and nuclei of enlarged cells of various organs of newborn infants dying because of jaundice, hepatomegaly, and other symptoms; also has been found incidentally in salivary gland epithelium, apparently as a localized or mild infection (salivary gland virus disease).
Synonym(s): inclusion body disease.

cytomegalic inclusion disease,

Patient discussion about cytomegalic inclusion disease

Q. What is it CMV during pregnancy? can i infect with that?

A. CMV is a virus. What you refer to is infection with CMV, either the initial infection, or re-activation of latent (dormant) virus that resides in the mother's body during pregnancy.

The dangers are that CMV will infect the fetus, which may cause malformations, particularly growth restriction and hearing impairment.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/cytomegalovirusinfections.html

Q. What is it CMV during pregnancy ? can i infect with that?

A. CMV or cytomegalovirus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytomegalovirus) is a virus that can cause disease (i.e. infectious mononucleosis, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infectious_mononucleosis) in everyone, not only pregnant women. The problem is that when a pregnant woman is infected in CMV for the first time of her life during pregnancy, CMV can cause malformations and problems with the baby, including hearing impairment and others (see also TORCHES: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TORCH_infections).

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