cytology

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cytology

 [si-tol´o-je]
the study of cells, their origin, structure, function, and pathology. adj., adj cytolog´ic.
aspiration biopsy cytology (ABC) the microscopic study of cells from superficial or internal lesions obtained by aspiration biopsy.
exfoliative cytology microscopic examination of cells desquamated from a body surface or lesion, done to detect malignancy or microbiologic changes, to measure hormonal levels, and for other purposes. The cells may be obtained by such procedures as aspiration, washing, smear, and scraping, and the technique may also be applied to secretions such as sputum, urine, abdominal fluid, prostatic secretions, and vaginal secretions.

cy·tol·o·gy

(sī-tol'ō-jē),
The study of the anatomy, physiology, pathology, and chemistry of the cell.
[cyto- + G. logos, study]

cytology

/cy·tol·o·gy/ (si-tol´ah-je) the study of cells, their origin, structure, function, and pathology.cytolog´ic
aspiration biopsy cytology  (ABC) the microscopic study of cells obtained from superficial or internal lesions by suction through a fine needle.
exfoliative cytology  microscopic examination of cells desquamated from a body surface or lesion as a means of detecting malignancy and microbiologic changes, to measure hormonal levels, etc. Such cells are obtained by aspiration, washing, smear, or scraping.

cytology

(sī-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of biology that deals with the formation, structure, and function of cells.

cy′to·log′ic (-tə-lŏj′ĭk), cy′to·log′i·cal adj.
cy·tol′o·gist n.

cytology

[sītol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, kytos + logos, science
the study of cells, including their formation, origin, structure, function, biochemical activities, and pathological characteristics. Kinds of cytology include aspiration biopsy cytology and exfoliative cytology. Also called cell biology. cytologic, cytological, adj.

cytology

Cell biology
The biology of structure, function, multiplication, pathology, and history of cells. In the working parlance, “cell biology” is preferred to “cytology,” given the obvious potential for confusion with health professionals (cytologists and cytotechnologists) who examine cell specimens to render clinical diagnoses. Those who study such phenomena are called cell biologists, not cytologists.

Medspeak
The formal discipline in which cells are studied and the changes seen correlated with the clinical findings in patients.
 
Pathology
The microscopic examination of body fluids for the detection of disease; in cytology, the most common specimen is the Pap smear, a normal component of a gynaecologic examination which is the best means of detecting early, curable stages of cancer of the uterine cervix—formerly the most common cause of death in sexually active women—as well as viral, fungal and other infections of the female genital tract. Cytology specimens can be obtained from various fluids (urine, CSF, or sputum or discharges) specifically as a means of detecting abnormal or malignant cells.

cytology

1. The formal discipline in which cells are studied and the changes seen correlated with the clinical findings in Pts.
2. Cytologic examination, cytologic study The microscopic examination of body fluids for the detection of disease; in cytology, the most common specimen is the Pap smear, a normal component of a gynecologic examination and is the best means of detecting early, curable stages of cancer the uterine cervix–formerly the most common cause of death in sexually active ♀ as well as viral, fungal and other infections of the ♀ genital tract; cytology specimens can be obtained from various fluids–urine, CSF, or sputum or discharges, specifically as a means of detecting abnormal or malignant cells. See Aspiration cytology, Automated cytology, Bile cytology, Brush cytology, Exfoliative cytology, Fine needle aspiration cytology, Needle aspiration cytology, Ocular cytology, Pap smear, Screening, Touch cytology, Urine cytology.

cy·tol·o·gy

(sī-tol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the anatomy, physiology, pathology, and chemistry of the cell.
Synonym(s): cellular biology.
[cyto- + G. logos, study]

cytology

1. The study of cells.
2. An abbreviation of the phrase ‘exfoliative cytology’ the examination of isolated cells, obtained from cervical smears, sputum or elsewhere, to determine whether or not they are cancerous.

cytology

the study of cells.

cytology 

A study of cells to detect diseases. The usual procedure is to obtain a sample, to fix it on a glass slide, treat it with various dyes and inspect it under a microscope. Differential staining allows identification of the cells and their state of health.

cy·tol·o·gy

(sī-tol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the anatomy, physiology, pathology, and chemistry of the cell.
[cyto- + G. logos, study]

cytology (sītol´əjē),

n the study of the anatomy, physiology, pathology, and chemistry of a cell.
cytology, exfoliative,
n the study of desquamated cells.

cytology

the study of cells, their origin, structure, function and pathology.

aspiration biopsy cytology (ABC)
the microscopic study of cells obtained from superficial or internal lesions by suction through a fine needle.
brush cytology
examination of cells obtained from a mucosal surface using a cytological brush.
exfoliative cytology
microscopic examination of cells desquamated from a body surface or lesion as a means of detecting malignancy and microbiological changes, to measure hormonal levels, etc. Such cells may be obtained by such procedures as aspiration, washing, smear and scraping, and the technique may be applied to vaginal secretions, urine, abdominal fluid, prostatic secretion, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
When a cytologist finds no malignant cells in a sample of the pancreatic juice or tissue obtained from a mucinous tumor, the patient who has been advised to undergo a Whipple procedure faces a dilemma and major life decision.
When a cytologist finds no malignant cells in a sample of the pancreatic juice or tissue obtained from a mucinous tumor, the elderly patient who has been advised to undergo a Whipple procedure faces a dilemma and major life decision.
Further studies are needed to confirm that cytologists should distinguish these cases from cases with indeterminate features that measure larger than 1 cm, which may have a significantly different risk of malignancy.
Thus, cytologists and pathologists must be award of HD-L transformation in the setting of low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, particularly following fludarabine therapy.
It has now signed a three-year deal to supply 1,000 CerviKits a year to the hospital, which is a training school for cytologists and has the second largest cytology department in the Midlands.
Now low pay is being blamed for a shortage of screeners, known as cytologists, who are often graduates.
This combination should be especially helpful to those women and their countries that do not now have access to Pap tests because of a lack of available cytologists and laboratories.
Cytology appeared unattractive to cancer researchers and a major gap developed, separating cytologists from the cell biologists who otherwise share a common interest in understanding cancer.
Cell-CT Platform Shows Potential as Game-Changing 21st Century Tool for Cytologists
The historical note focused on the 2 other groups (in Stockholm and Oss) because the intended audience was clinical chemists, not histologists or cytologists.
Methyl colchicine, colcemid, which differs from colchicine by having an N-methyl group instead of a N-acetyl group, is widely used by animal cell workers but less so by plant cytologists, and the same is true of the alkaloid vinblastine.
Clinical data have shown that cytologists can detect seven times more abnormal Pap smears using the PAPNET test compared to re-screening with the microscope alone.