cystoscope

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cystoscope

 [sis´to-skōp]
a hollow metal endoscope especially designed for passing through the urethra into the bladder to permit visual inspection of the bladder interior. See also cystoscopy.

cys·to·scope

(sis'tō-skōp),
A lighted tubular endoscope for examining the interior of the bladder.
[cysto- + G. skopeō, to examine]

cystoscope

(sĭs′tə-skōp′)
n.
A tubular instrument equipped with a light and used to examine the interior of the urinary bladder and ureter.

cys′to·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk) adj.
cys·tos′co·py (sĭ-stŏs′kə-pē) n.

cystoscope

[sis′təskōp′]
Etymology: Gk, kystis + skopein, to look
an instrument for examining and treating lesions of the urethra or bladder. There are both rigid and flexible types. The rigid instrument consists of an obturator for introduction, an outer sheath, a lighting system, a viewing lens, and ports for catheters and operative devices. The flexible cystoscope is a self-contained endoscope with ports for instrumentation and irrigation. Flexible cystoscopes are more commonly used today and incorporate fiberoptics.
enlarge picture
Cystoscope in the male bladder

cys·to·scope

(sis'tŏ-skōp)
A lighted tubular endoscope for examining the interior of the bladder.
[cysto- + G. skopeō, to examine]

cystoscope

A straight tubular instrument which allows illumination of the inside of the urinary bladder so that direct examination, and various forms of treatment, are possible.

Cystoscope

A viewing instrument that is passed up the urethra into the region of the prostate to get a good look at the organ "from the inside."

cystoscope

an endoscope especially designed for passing through the urethra into the bladder to permit visual inspection of the interior of that organ. It has an outer sheath with a lighting system, a telescope with forward or oblique viewing, and an obturator which can be removed to allow passage of various devices.
References in periodicals archive ?
The same goes for cystoscopies, when checking on bladder cancer.
If this can be confirmed in a larger cohort of patients, it may help to reduce the number of cystoscopies in patients with superficial UCC.
While bladder cancer has a high survival rate, its high rate of recurrence means that currently, survivors must undergo cystoscopies at regular intervals over their lifetime.
However, our data suggest that patients with high-risk superficial UCB who are NMP22 positive with negative cystoscopies are even more likely to recur than patients who are NMP22 negative.
These markers may aid in the monitoring of patients with bladder carcinoma and have the potential to reduce the number of follow-up cystoscopies, thus reducing healthcare costs and patient discomfort and, at the same time, detecting relapsing disease more effectively than VUC.
In addition, the paper concluded that the BTA stat test may be able to substitute for many periodic cystoscopies after initial diagnosis and treatment.