cystine


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cystine

 [sis´tēn, sis´tin]
a naturally occurring amino acid, the chief sulfur-containing component of the protein molecule. It is sometimes found in the urine and in the kidneys in the form of minute hexagonal crystals, frequently forming cystine calculus in the bladder.
cystine storage disease Fanconi's syndrome (def. 2).

cys·tine

(sis'tēn, sis'tin), Do not confuse this word with cysteine.
3,3'-Dithiobis(2-aminopropionic acid); the disulfide product of two cysteines in which two -SH groups become one -S-S- group; if two cysteinyl residues in polypeptide chains form a disulfide linkage, then the two polymers are cross-linked; sometimes occurs as a deposit in the urine, or forming a vesical calculus. Compare: meso-cystine.
Synonym(s): dicysteine

cystine

/cys·tine/ (sis´tēn) (sis´tin) a sulfur-containing amino acid produced by digestion or acid hydrolysis of proteins, sometimes found in the urine and kidneys, and readily reduced to two molecules of cysteine.

cystine

(sĭs′tēn′)
n.
A white crystalline amino acid, C6H12N2O4S2, that is formed from the disulfide linkage of two cysteines during the folding of many proteins, especially keratin, and stabilizes the tertiary structure of the protein.

cystine

[sis′tin]
a compound consisting of two cysteine residues joined by a disulfide (S-S) linkage. Compare cysteine.
enlarge picture
Chemical structure of cystine

cys·tine

(sis'tēn)
The disulfide product of two cysteines in which two -SH groups become one -S-S- group; sometimes occurs as a deposit in the urine, or forming a vesical calculus.
Cystineclick for a larger image
Fig. 127 Cystine . Formation of cystine.

cystine [Cys-Cys]

an amino acid residue formed by the OXIDATION of the sulphydryl groups [SH] of two CYSTEINES generating a DISULPHIDE BRIDGE (S-S); See Fig. 127 . In some PROTEINS, side chains can be cross-linked by disulphide bridges as a result of the formation of cystines. See SULPHUR BRIDGE.

cystine

a naturally occurring amino acid, an important sulfur-containing component of the protein molecule. It is sometimes found in the urine and in the kidneys in the form of minute hexagonal crystals, frequently forming cystine calculus in the bladder.
Enlarge picture
Cystine stones. By permission from Nelson RW, Couto CG, Small Animal Internal Medicine, Mosby, 2003

cystine calculi
see cystine uroliths.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, poor adherence to therapy has been a major challenge resulting in poor sustained control of cystine levels, and patients consequently experience poor clinical outcomes, including kidney insufficiency leading to dialysis and kidney transplantation, muscle wasting and in some cases, premature death.
Only 1 of the patients would have been considered "at risk" for devolvement of cystine stones according to the 24-h collection results.
Dietary restriction of sodium as a means of reducing urinary cystine.
According to the transsulfuration data, it can be concluded that the higher cystine formation with HMTBA compared to DLM could explain the higher glutathione level observed in the present study.
The inclusion of mannitol selenite cystine (MSC) broth in the bacteriological methods as an adjunct to Rappaport-Vassiliadis (RV) broth was based on earlier work (Grau and Smith 1972) showing MSC broth useful for ovine faeces, and superior to tetrathionate and mannitol-selenite broths.
In patients with cystinosis, the amino acid cystine accumulates in the body's tissue because of the inability of the body to transport cystine out of the cell.
Doctors may perform one of the following surgical procedures to treat large stones, stones composed of cystine or stones lodged in the ureters (tubes between the kidneys and the bladder):
The leaves are an exceptionally good source of vitamins A, B and C, of various minerals and of the sulphur-containing amino acids methionine and cystine.
It causes the build-up of the amino acid cystine in Lena's system which forms crystals and attacks the body's vital organs.
Tryptase: a mast cell serine protease, in Barrett A J (Ed): Methods in Enzymology Proteolytic Enzymes: Serine and Cystine Peptidases.