cystatin C


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cystatin C

(sĭs′tăt-ĭn)
A cysteine proteinase inhibitor found in the bloodstream in elevated concentrations in patients with impaired kidney function. It is a small protein composed of 120 amino acids (mass 13 kD) that is produced by nucleated cells throughout the body and easily filtered by the glomeruli of the kidneys. It is reabsorbed and catabolized by proximal tubular cells. Because levels of cystatin C do not depend on a patient's age, height, muscle mass, or weight, it is thought to be a better measure of kidney function than the creatinine clearance test, which is most often used to assess renal health.
References in periodicals archive ?
Serum concentration of Cystatin C is independent from muscle mass and gender.
Cystatin C is a 13-kDa cysteine protease inhibitor produced at a constant rate by most nucleated cells.
Creatinine is among the most common analyses used by Swedish laboratories, and the newer test of cystatin C is spreading rapidly.
Measuring creatinine and cystatin C -- two markers for chronic kidney disease (CKD) -- more precisely estimates kidney function than either marker alone, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.
Researchers at the San Francisco Veteran's Affairs Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco, analyzed the ability of cystatin C levels to identify impaired kidney function.
The investigators calculated glomerular filtration rate with serum creatinine and with a serum cystatin C equation.
Taupin looks at the structure of chicken cystatin and human cystatin C, dimerization and domain swapping, amyloidosis and anyloidogenc proteins, pathology and therapy, and other aspects.
Levels of cystatin C indicate that kidney function is compromised in people living with HIV, according to a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine recently.
Blood levels of creatinine and cystatin C were measured in 742 participants to calculate glomerular function.
Researchers have found a new correlation between Alzheimer's disease and a gene known as Cystatin C, in people older than 80.