cyclosporine


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cyclosporine

 [si″klo-spōr´in]
a cyclic peptide from an extract of soil fungi, an inhibitor of t cell function; used as an immunosuppressant to prevent and treat rejection in organ transplant recipients and to treat severe psoriasis and as a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug.

cy·clo·spor·ine

(sī'klō-spōr'ēn),
A cyclic oligopeptide immunosuppressant produced by the fungus Tolypocladium inflatum Gams; used to inhibit organ transplant rejection.

cyclosporine

/cy·clo·spor·ine/ (-spor´ēn) a cyclic peptide from an extract of soil fungi that selectively inhibits T cell function; used as an immunosuppressant to prevent rejection in organ transplant recipients and to treat severe psoriasis and severe rheumatoid arhtritis.

cyclosporine

(sī′klə-spôr′ēn, -ĭn) also

cyclosporin

(-ĭn)
n.
An immunosuppressive drug obtained from certain soil fungi, used mainly to prevent the rejection of transplanted organs.

cyclosporine

Immunology A cyclic undecapeptide, which induces potent T-cell immunosuppression; cyclosporine mitigates GVHD, allograft rejection, ulcerative colitis, autoimmune disease, schistosomiasis; it may be of use in aplastic anemia, in combination with antilymphocyte globulin and methylprednisone for psoriasis Adverse effects Nephrotoxicity, HTN, neurotoxicity–eg, tremor, seizures, encephalopathy, headache, coma, hyperlipidemia, hyperkalemia, hypomagnesemia, HTN, anemia, anaphylaxis, nausea, paresthesias, ↑ EBV, lymphoma, pseudolymphoma, fluid retention, thromboses, hirsutism, liver toxicity Lab ↑ Creatinine, ↑ uric acid, ↑ BR, ↑ cholesterol. Cf Tacrolimus.

cy·clo·spor·ine

(sī'klō-spōr'ēn)
A cyclic oligopeptide immunosuppressant produced by the fungus Tolypocladium inflatum Gams; used to inhibit organ transplant rejection.

ciclosporin (cyclosporine) 

An immunosuppressant used in the treatment of the ocular manifestation of autoimmune diseases, uveitis, scleritis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, ligneous conjunctivitis, and to prevent rejection of corneal grafts, etc. It is believed to exert its immunosuppressive effect by inhibiting the activation of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. See immunosuppressants.

cy·clo·spor·ine

(sī'klō-spōr'ēn)
A cyclic oligopeptide immunosuppressant used to inhibit organ transplant rejection.

cyclosporine (sī´klōspor´ēn),

n brand name: Sandimmune;
drug class: immunosuppressant;
action: produces immunosuppression by inhibiting lymphocytes;
uses: to prevent rejection of tissues and/or organ transplants.

cyclosporine

a neutral cyclic peptide, the major metabolic product of the fungus Tolypocladium inflatum; a specific suppressor of the T lymphocyte response, important in tissue transplantation.
References in periodicals archive ?
tHcy was higher in patients treated with cyclosporine (mean [+ or -] SD, 16.
To avoid rapid reduction of the cyclosporine level, verapamil was decreased from 360 to 240 mg/day, and clonidine therapy was discontinued.
This study doesn't indicate that giving transplant patients cyclosporine will cause normal cells to become cancerous, but the data do suggest that the drug might exacerbate tumor growth in patients with existing malignancies, says Gary J.
In patients at low to moderate risk of acute rejection, it is recommended that Rapamune be used initially in combination with cyclosporine and corticosteroids; cyclosporine should be withdrawn approximately 3 months after transplantation.
Because 10 of the 11 patients in the pilot trial experienced subjective relief of bladder pain, a prospective trial was undertaken that included 23 patients who all received 3 mg/kg of cyclosporine divided in two daily doses.
Overall, 3 patients (11%) in the azathioprine group and 2 patients (6%) in the cyclosporine group delivered at less than 32 weeks' gestation.
At 5 years, with regard to any skin carcinoma there were fewer lesions with cyclosporine withdrawal, 109 vs 39 (SRL-CsA-ST vs SRL-ST), and the mean annualized rates were lower, 107.
Specimens in glass and plastic tubes were collected simultaneously from renal transplant patients receiving cyclosporine to prevent rejection.
Law counters that his earlier research showed that myoblast transfer, not cyclosporine, produced an improvement in muscle might.
5 mg/kg per day of cyclosporine, even though doses of less than 3 mg/kg are known to have poor efficacy.
Intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses of any skin carcinoma are given below: * At 5 years, with regard to any skin carcinoma there were fewer lesions with cyclosporine withdrawal, 109 vs 39 (SRL-CsA-ST vs SRL-ST), and the mean annualized rates were lower, 107.
Sirolimus is the first of a new class of immunosuppressants that unlike cyclosporine, have been shown to inhibit cancers in experimental models.