cyclosarin


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cy·clo·sar·in

(sī'klō-sar'in)
A nonpersistent nerve agent. Its NATO code is GF.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Other OP compounds include Tabun, a deadly compound that was developed in 1936 by German scientists during World War II, followed by Sarin (1938), Soman (1944), Cyclosarin (1949) and VX (1952) respectively.
Effects of low-level exposure to sarin and cyclosarin during the 1991 Gulf War on brain function and brain structure in US veterans.
The claims are directed to both film forming coatings (paints, clear coatings) and non-film forming coatings having enzymes capable of providing decontamination organophosphorus-based pesticides and chemical warfare agents (VX, soman, sarin, cyclosarin, tabun) from surfaces upon application of the coatings.
The same media failed to fully inform people that the UN twice threatened military action against Iraq, in 1998 and 2002, or that the best Hans Blix could offer, if given more time, was that there were no WMD in the areas he had been asked to inspect, or that WMD missiles, still usable, with some containing cyclosarin - which is stronger and longer-lasting than sarin - had been found post-invasion.
In 1991, soldiers destroyed two large Iraqi weapons caches containing sarin and cyclosarin.
The blast, on March 11, 1991, forced deadly sarin and cyclosarin gas high into the air, engulfing up to 10,000 of our soldiers.
The missiles were discovered early last month in a bunker and tested positive for cyclosarin a substance many times stronger than sarin.
inspectors and, inter alia, admitted to having produced 2,850 tons of mustard gas (a blister agent used repeatedly during the Iraq-Iran War), 210 tons of tabun (a nerve agent used in the Iraq-Iran war), 795 tons of sarin (another nerve agent used against Iran), 795 tons of cyclosarin (another nerve agent used against Iran), 2,200 gallons of anthrax (believed by many experts to be similar to the anthrax mailed to various individuals following the 9/11 attacks), 5,000 gallons of botulinum toxin, 581 gallons of aflatoxin, and numerous other chemical and biological agents.
The following statement summarized the government's case for war: "Our assessment is that Iraq has the capability to produce the chemical agents mustard gas, tabun, sarin, cyclosarin, and VX, and the biological [agents] anthrax, botulinum toxin, aflatoxin, and ricin.
His regime had large, unaccounted-for stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons--including VX, sarin, cyclosarin, and mustard gas, anthrax, botulism, and possibly smallpox.
The October 2002 NIE said Iraq "is expanding its infrastructure, under cover of civilian industries, that it could use to advance its chemical weapons agent production capability," and that the totality of evidence "strongly suggest that Iraq maintains a stockpile of chemical agents, probably VX, sarin, cyclosarin, and mustard.