cycad


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cycad

(sī′kad″, kăd) [L. Cycas, a genus name]
A variety of palmlike evergreen plants, including Cycas revoluta and C. circinalis, from which cycasin has been isolated.

cycad

any tropical or subtropical GYMNOSPERM of the order Cycadales. Cycads date from the MESOZOIC PERIOD. Present-day forms grow to 20 m in height and have a crown of fern-like leaves. They live for up to a thousand years.

cycad

a member of the plant genus of cycas, dioecious, non-flowering woody plants (gymnosperms) which produce seeds in a woody cone consisting of exposed seed leaves (sporophylls), not enclosed in an ovary. The leaves are usually in a rosette at the top of the stem, which may be subterranean. Include Bowenia, Cycas, Dioon, Encephalartos, Lepidozamia, Macrozamia, Zamia spp.

cycad glycoside
group of glycosides including cycasin, macrozamin, found in cycad plants; oxidized in vivo to release toxin methylazoxymethanol (MAM).
References in periodicals archive ?
If Corner's (1976) terminology may be applied to gymnspermous seeds, the cycad seed coat should be classified as mesotestal since the sclerenchymatous layer is situated in the middle part of the seed coat.
In order to be well positioned within the sector and to be able to capitalise on the infrastructure spend, Stefanutti Stocks has taken a strategic decision to acquire the Cycad Group, said the firm.
Zoo, places a cycad in a greenhouse at the zoo's ``rescue center.
But resident brain specialist John Steele was satisfied that the cycad was not guilty.
We are thankful for the continued support of NEA and welcome the addition of Cycad and Windham.
His research led him to the story of Fossil Cycad National Monument, a real-life example of a park that was decommissioned after visitors lifted so many of the fossils from the surface that there were none left to protect.
Cycad plants have been utilised by Indigenous peoples in many parts of the world, and researchers have been particularly interested in the relationships between people and these toxic plants.
then a neurotoxicologist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, briefly resurrected the BMAA hypothesis and reported shaking and paralysis in macaques fed BMAA, (9) but his work was heavily criticized by another team of neurologists that argued that people would have to eat kilograms of cycad flour to ingest a comparable dose.