cyborg


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cyborg

(sī′bôrg′)
n.
An organism, often a human, that has certain physiological processes enhanced or controlled by mechanical or electronic devices, especially when they are integrated with the nervous system.
A hypothetical term for a person with bionic and/or cybernetic replacement parts that may have capabilities that the original biological components did not—e.g., increased strength, telescopic vision, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A dimension highlighted in this concept of human as cyborg but not mentioned in the previous model is that humans and things are separable and can reconnect as cyborg without the loss of individual distinctness.
I'm looking forward to showcasing Spectrocable, Stealth Wireless, Shadow and Spectre Vault and discussing the future of Cyborg Industries for the first time.
Grace a ces techniques, il s'agirait non seulement d'augmenter les capacites de l'homme (d'oE le nom "Humanity +" choisi par le mouvement a l'echelle internationale), mais aussi de preparer la transition vers des "posthumains", sortes de cyborgs (organismes cybernetiques) qui succederaient a notre espece.
The FedDev Ontario investment will allow us to rapidly scale our global growth strategy by allowing us to accelerate our plans to hire top Canadian talent," said James McInnes, founder and CEO of Cyborg Trading Systems.
Donna Haraway, historian of science, and author of the hugely influential "A Cyborg Manifesto: Science Technology and Socialist Feminism in the Late Twentieth Century" (1985), is careful to mark the distinction between cyborgs as "ether, quintessence," and humans that are "nowhere near so fluid, being both material and opaque" (153).
Haraway writes that "a cyborg world is about the final imposition of a grid of control on the planet, about the final abstraction embodied in a Star Wars apocalypse waged in the name of defence, about the final appropriation of women's bodies in a masculinist orgy of war" (1985, p.
Although the schizophrenic and the cyborg constitute two very different responses to the perceived crisis in subjectivity, Jameson and Haraway share a similar approach to the postmodern as an economically and technologically distinct historical period.
Seven of Nine is the most famous of science fiction cyborgs.
Last night, as he promotes his book I Cyborg, he delivered the Christmas lecture at The National Museum, and attempted to bring the message of his predictions and his life work to a new audience.
A cyborg body is not innocent; it was not born in a garden; it does not seek unitary identity and so generate antagonistic dualisms (or until the world ends); it takes irony for granted.
His ongoing research in dance and new technologies includes computer-generated cyborgs which he manipulates through virtual space.
The interchangeable metal body parts of cyborg toys probably are natural cultural manifestations of the world of synthetic organs and test-tube fertilization, neither of which has spelled doomsday.