cyberspace


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A computer-based interactive 3D simulation, in which users take the form of avatars visible to others graphically

cyberspace

(sī′bĕr-spās″) [ cyber- + space]
1. The Internet.
2. An electronic representation of the world as stored in data and shared among computers; the virtual world.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 780th MI Brigade at Fort Meade, Maryland, is bringing cyberspace support to Corps and below echelons of the Army.
Foreign Minister Kamara stressed that Liberia has the potential to leverage cyberspace to achieve sustainable economic growth, considering its youthful population and the demand for cyberspace education; however, it will need to partner with countries such as China, which is one of the world's major contributors to and user of modern technological breakthroughs, and which has vast human capacity.
Thus, it is indeed difficult for the government to regulate cyberspace based on its architecture.
The value of private industry personnel and expertise to airpower contingency operations cannot be overstated as private industry is said to constitute "the primary catalyst for technological advancements" and public sector entities seem increasingly reliant on commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technologies that risk the vulnerabilities recorded in Annex 3-12, Cyberspace Operations.
11) There are almost certainly assets in the cyberspace domain that could be defined as critical, and their identification should be prioritized due to the potential impact on national security.
Cyberspace resilience will be the key to flying, fighting, and winning in a contested cyberspace environment.
This includes access to system controls, monitoring, administration, and integration of cybersecurity into all aspects of engineering and acquisition of cyberspace capabilities.
The typical business mind-set focuses on efficiency to generate as much profit as possible, while the military mind-set loves both efficiency and order, but both concepts are antithetical to flexibility in cyberspace.
Effective integration and synchronization of cyberspace operations results in simultaneous and complementary effects leading to achieve objectives consistent with the commander's intent and concept of operations.
Chris Demchak writes about "cybered conflict," which I thought to be a most remarkable approach of how cyberspace should be contemplated in national security, either as a domain or as discrete operations.
Western military thinking tends to see the world in a Newtonian structure with clear-cut physical laws, but cyberspace is different.
You have heard or will be hearing from a number of Air Force leaders at this conference, including: General William Shelton, Commander of Air Force Space Command, which is the lead for our cyberspace operations; Major General Suzanne Vautrinot, Commander of the 24th Air Force, which supports the cyberspace operations needs of our Combatant Commanders; Air Force Chief Scientist Dr.