cybersickness

Psychology Simulator sickness, cyber side effects A constellation of clinical findings that may affect those subjected to ‘total immersion’ virtual reality (VR), in which external audio, visual, and possibly also tactile sensation—when using a ‘virtual glove’—are replaced by computer-generated information.
Sexology The term has also been used to described the plethora of ‘sick’ and predatory activities, including cyber stalking, that occur over the Internet for which there is no universally accepted alternative

cybersickness

Simulator sickness, cyber side effects A constellation of findings that may affect those subjected to 'total immersion' virtual reality–VR, in which external audio, visual, possibly–when using a 'virtual glove' also tactile sensation, are replaced by computer-generated information Clinical Autonomic Sx–eg, cold sweats, N&V, motion sickness occurring while 'plugged in' to VR devices, post-session residua in the form of altered perceptions and flashbacks. See Porn addiction.
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Where producers discuss quality of experience for flat video with terms like abandonment rate, in the VR world it's cybersickness or nausea, which presumably generates a much stronger antipathy toward your company or brand than does a pre-roll ad.
Svec, a psychologist who writes for health and wellness websites, explains the science behind balance and balance issues like motion sickness, persistent postural-perceptual dizziness, and cybersickness.
Comparing the onset of cybersickness using the Oculus Rift and two virtual roller coasters.
And now we have the most modern form of this age-old condition - cybersickness or digital motion sickness.
Some of symptoms of cybersickness are nausea, inflammation of the eyes, giddiness, dizziness, inability to focus, sweating, and headache.
Multiple studies found that using virtual environments is feasible with PWD without problems of cybersickness or disorientation (e.
Other topics under study include editing and constraining kinematic approximations of dynamic motion, cybersickness induced by desktop virtual realty, and the effects of mindfulness meditation training on multitasking in a high-stress information environment.
Finally, prolonged exposure to VR can cause cybersickness (Kennedy & Lilienthal, 1994), which has been associated with postural instability (Riccio & Stoffregen, 1991).
There is evidence to suggest cybersickness may be overcome or moderated by providing users with an optimal level of user-initiated control over their movements in the virtual world.
Cybersickness in the presence of scene rotational movements along different axes.
Collectively, these symptoms are often referred to as cybersickness (McCauley & Sharkey, 1992).
This type of sickness has been referred to as a type of vection-induced sickness (Hettinger, Berbaum, Kennedy, Dunlap, & Nolan, 1990) and is called cybersickness (McCauley & Sharkey, 1992).