cybernetics

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cybernetics

 [si″ber-net´iks]
the science of communication and control in the animal and in the machine.

cy·ber·net·ics

(sī'ber-net'iks),
1. The comparative study of computers and the human nervous system, with intent to explain the functioning of the brain.
See also: feedback.
2. The science of control and communication in both living and nonliving systems; characteristically, control is governed by feedback, that is, by communication within the system concerning the difference between the actual and the desired result, action then being modified so as to minimize this difference.
See also: feedback.
[G. kybernētica, things pertaining to control or piloting]

cybernetics

/cy·ber·net·ics/ (si″ber-net´iks) the science of the processes of communication and control in the animal and in the machine.

cybernetics

(sī′bər-nĕt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The theoretical study of communication and control processes in biological, mechanical, and electronic systems, especially the comparison of these processes in biological and artificial systems.

cy′ber·net′ic adj.
cy′ber·net′i·cal·ly adv.
cy′ber·net′i·cist, cy′ber·ne·ti′cian (-nĭ-tĭsh′ən) n.

cybernetics

[sī′bərnet′iks]
the science of control and communication in living and nonliving systems, as in comparative study of electronic computers and the living brain.

cybernetics

The formal study of the functions of human control and the mechanical and electronic devices designed to replace them.

cy·ber·net·ics

(sī'bĕr-net'iks)
1. The comparative study of computers and the human nervous system, with intent to explain the functioning of the brain.
2. The science of control and communication in both living and nonliving systems; characteristically, control is governed by feedback, that is, by communication within the system concerning the difference between the actual and the desired result, action then being modified so as to minimize this difference.
See also: feedback
[G. kybernētika, things pertaining to control or piloting]

cybernetics

The study of the control and communication systems common to machines and animals, including the human being. The study of the analogies between complex feedback control systems and human physiology has been fruitful to both disciplines.

cybernetics

the study of the comparison of control in the workings of the living body with man-made mechanical systems such as are used in robots.

cybernetics

the science of communication and control in the animal and in the machine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Information theory, as developed in those years by cyberneticists such as Wiener and Shannon, does oppose the idea of entropy, but also relies on probability, which determines the unpredictable and combinatory nature of information and thus establishes a principle that does not envisage any cogent result.
Similarly, cyberneticists would say that it might seem like we differ fundamentally from man-made devices, but we really are nothing more than highly complex computers.
Cyberneticists call this condition "systems runaway.
For masculine laughter on this virtual subject, you have to look to Arthur Kroker's "theory-fiction" Spasm, with its inspired rants about Biosphere 2, Michael Jackson, latex sex, Madonna and the dead Elvis; "the dryware of sadomasochism lite" and "the recline of Western civilization," though even Canadian wild-man Krober buys into AI machine dreams, against all evidence that the genetic engineers are a lot further along, custom-compounding organic mutants, than the cyberneticists are anywhere near an artificial hand or eye, much less consciousness.