cybernetics

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Related to cybernetician: cybernetics

cybernetics

 [si″ber-net´iks]
the science of communication and control in the animal and in the machine.

cy·ber·net·ics

(sī'ber-net'iks),
1. The comparative study of computers and the human nervous system, with intent to explain the functioning of the brain.
See also: feedback.
2. The science of control and communication in both living and nonliving systems; characteristically, control is governed by feedback, that is, by communication within the system concerning the difference between the actual and the desired result, action then being modified so as to minimize this difference.
See also: feedback.
[G. kybernētica, things pertaining to control or piloting]

cybernetics

/cy·ber·net·ics/ (si″ber-net´iks) the science of the processes of communication and control in the animal and in the machine.

cybernetics

(sī′bər-nĕt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The theoretical study of communication and control processes in biological, mechanical, and electronic systems, especially the comparison of these processes in biological and artificial systems.

cy′ber·net′ic adj.
cy′ber·net′i·cal·ly adv.
cy′ber·net′i·cist, cy′ber·ne·ti′cian (-nĭ-tĭsh′ən) n.

cybernetics

[sī′bərnet′iks]
the science of control and communication in living and nonliving systems, as in comparative study of electronic computers and the living brain.

cybernetics

The formal study of the functions of human control and the mechanical and electronic devices designed to replace them.

cy·ber·net·ics

(sī'bĕr-net'iks)
1. The comparative study of computers and the human nervous system, with intent to explain the functioning of the brain.
2. The science of control and communication in both living and nonliving systems; characteristically, control is governed by feedback, that is, by communication within the system concerning the difference between the actual and the desired result, action then being modified so as to minimize this difference.
See also: feedback
[G. kybernētika, things pertaining to control or piloting]

cybernetics

The study of the control and communication systems common to machines and animals, including the human being. The study of the analogies between complex feedback control systems and human physiology has been fruitful to both disciplines.

cybernetics

the study of the comparison of control in the workings of the living body with man-made mechanical systems such as are used in robots.

cybernetics

the science of communication and control in the animal and in the machine.
References in periodicals archive ?
I am suggesting that the cybernetician paradigm profoundly transformed the core of the philosophy of social sciences as well as of these sciences themselves.
Cyberneticians in general are attracted to the idea that the process of constructing social convention is best done in this way.
The key to his contribution is in the following comment: `the cybernetician must apply his competence to himself lest he will lose all scientific credibility'.
7) A cybernetic reading of control would have to acknowledge that there is perhaps more to the events surrounding the emergence and development of the science than meets the eye--a point that is suggested by the interesting work by Andrew Pickering on British cyberneticians and by Eden Medina on the politics of cybernetics in Chile, for example.
McEwan, who seems to have studied at least briefly with Gordon Pask and Stafford Beer, and who draws upon their British tradition of 'management' cybernetics--focused on organisational dynamics and social interaction, rather than, say, artificial neurons or anti-aircraft guns--to articulate a case for anarchy based in the scientific concept of self-organisation, or as he states himself, 'to suggest that some of the concepts used by cyberneticians studying evolving self-organizing systems may be relevant to anarchist theory, and that some of the conclusions drawn from this study tend to favour libertarian models of social organization' (McEwan 1963: 270).
Do the cyberneticians and their ilk really imagine that people can be talked into 'free experimentation' within bounds laid down by authoritarian decree?
As the cyberneticians themselves would tell us, no self-correcting, self-sustaining system is completely "closed.
Poe's text is essential for psychoanalysis, Lacan declared, but he also noted the fact that cyberneticians make something of it too.
Cyberneticians use a constructivist epistemology and assume that the system of interest is defined by the observer.
Cyberneticians maintain that the working of analogue and digital machines resemble the way that organisms work.
Schwaninger M (1997) Global transdisciplinary research cooperation: 30 cyberneticians online.
It is typical for second-order cyberneticians like Maturana (1988a) and yon Glasersfeld (1991) to take a deeper step into biology than most humanists.