cracker

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cracker

of little worth; term used to describe old sheep in poor condition and with no teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
But in the next five years conventional robbers will begin to work with cybercrooks to facilitate their committing conventional robberies, he says.
This 2007 worm infected millions of computers and then took its infections further than the last two worms on our list, as cybercrooks moved from notoriety to professionalism.
Keep in mind that gaming and entertainment devices are now Internet-connected - Many people don't realize that their new gaming console may represent another port of entry for cybercrooks into their household.
During peak travel times when consumers often look online for affordable holiday rentals, cybercrooks post fake holiday rental sites that ask for down payments on properties by credit card or wire transfer.
In this report, we will study the latest tools and equipment used by cybercrooks to ensure their own security.
With a majority of Brazilians banking online, cybercrooks use sophisticated social engineering scams to trick Brazilians into giving up personal information.
Indeed, over the past two years, cybercrooks have substantially innovated in terms of business fraud, combining traditional scams with increasingly numerous technical means (particularly with the help of targeted Trojans).
Cybercrooks will increasingly target smaller, less-popular sites with data-thieving phishing scams.
Now any PC user can surf and search the web with confidence and without fear of losing their ID, bank account information, credit card details, valuable files and information to cybercrooks.
The malware may already be within your PC, which then exposes your personal and financial information to cybercrooks.
No matter where you live or what language you speak, cybercrooks will exploit basic human nature, zeroing in on emotions of fear, curiosity, greed, and sympathy," said Green.
A Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 user with Internet Explorer 7 installed can become a victim by simply clicking a malicious Web link, a favorite attack method among cybercrooks.