cyanogenic glycosides


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

cyanogenic glycosides

[sī′ənōjənet′ik]
chemical compounds contained in foods that release hydrogen cyanide when chewed or digested. The act of chewing or digestion leads to hydrolysis of the substances, causing cyanide to be released. Cyanogenetic glycosides are present in apples, apricots, cherries, peaches, plums, and quinces, particularly in the seeds of such fruits. The chemicals are also found in almonds, sorghum, lima beans, cassava, corn, yams, chick-peas, cashews, and kirsch. Although human poisoning by cyanogenetic glycosides is rare, cases of cyanide poisoning by certain varieties of lima beans, cassava, and bitter almonds have been reported.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ingestion of cyanide or a cyanogenic glycoside can trigger off a lot of toxic manifestations.
The rich steroidal saponins and sapogenic constituents, mainly simple phenolics and cyanogenic glycosides, may be responsible for the antidiabetic properties (Marles and Farnsworth, 1995).
Many cyanogenic glycosides have been implicated in allelopathy (Rice, 1984).