cyanobacterium


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cyanobacterium

(sī′ə-nō-băk-tîr′ē-əm, sī-ăn′ō-)
n. pl. cyanobac·teria (-tîr′ē-ə)
Any of various photosynthetic bacteria of the phylum Cyanobacteria that are generally blue-green in color and are widespread in marine and freshwater environments, with some species capable of nitrogen fixation. Also called blue-green alga, blue-green bacterium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inhibitors of serine proteases from a waterbloom of the cyanobacterium Microcystis sp.
Protease inhibitors from a Slovenian Lake Bled toxic waterbloom of the cyanobacterium Planktothrix rubescens.
Primary irritant and delayed-contact hypersensitivity reactions to the freshwater cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and its associated toxin cylindrospermopsin.
The algae, Tetraselmis chui (PLY429) and the cyanobacterium (GH-05-01), for this experiment were grown semicontinuously in E medium at a temperature of 19.
of Prochlorococcus and the similarly sized cyanobacterium Synechococcus
Trichodesmium, a filamentous cyanobacterium, plays an important ecological role by replenishing nitrogen in the central oceanic gyres--areas of widely circulating currents in the middle of oceans-where nutrients like nitrogen, required by other marine microorganisms for growth, would otherwise be low.
That suggests the cyanobacterium, even in the open expanse of an ocean, regularly encounters other microbes that seek to kill it with chemical weapons, says Palenik.
flos-aquae, and further expansion of this cyanobacterium will be determined by the eutrophication process and by the absence of other cyanoprocaryotes.
In 1996, KDRI completed the base sequence of the cyanobacterium genome, one of the first living organisms on earth capable of photosynthesis, and the largest genome sequenced at that time.
To re-test the 1967 hypothesis, the team performed new biochemical and genetic analyses on a cyanobacterium called Synechococcus sp.
Rath and Adhikary, [14] demonstrated that the exposure of estuarine cyanobacterium Lyngbya aestuarii to UV-B radiation resulted in differential expression of cellular proteins.