cutting edge

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cut·ting edge

1. the beveled, knifelike, sharpened working angle of a dental hand instrument;
2. Synonym(s): incisal margin

cutting edge

adjective Advanced–eg, cutting edge research. Cf State of the art.

cut·ting edge

(kŭting ej)
1. Line formed where face and lateral edges of the working-end of an instrument meet at an angle forming a sharp cutting surface.
2. Synonym(s): incisal margin.

cutting edge,

n the edge of a periodontal instrument formed where the lateral side and face of the instrument meet.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cutting edges are ground, sharp, the rake face is positive, and the frontal centerpoint is slightly below the tool center to ensure soft cuts.
New end mills, uncoated or with the unique PVD-coating of TiCN or TiAIN, have sharp cutting edges and high resistance to impact and interrupted cutting action.
The shown tools are equipped with unique tangential inserts with four cutting edges.
The inserts, with two cutting edges and with very high positive rake angles, are available in uncoated carbide grade ISO K-10 and with PCD brazed tips.
The helical cutting edge is the intersecting line or curve between the cylindrical outer surface of the cutter and a plane which contains the cutting edge itself.
These square inserts combine the helical cutting edge on all four edges with an additional wiper to perform for 90-degree sidewall milling operations.
Also, an alloyed or coated cutting edge can reduce cratering because of greater chemical inertness.
Deformation is usually seen under the cutting edge when tool material bulges out from the original surface.
Built-up edge - This type of failure is identified by a ragged cutting edge produced by material buildup on the insert's rake face.
As this buildup extends out to the cutting edge, it actually becomes the cutting edge.
Higher lead angles help by distributing the cutting forces over a wider section of the cutting edge.
Chipping - When the mechanical load of an operation exceeds the strength or toughness of the cutting edge, an insert may chip.