cutaneous vasculitis

cu·ta·ne·ous vas·cu·li·tis

an acute form of vasculitis that may affect the skin only, but also may involve other organs, with a polymorphonuclear infiltrate in the walls of and surrounding small (dermal) vessels. Nuclear fragments are formed by karyorrhexis of the neutrophils.
See also: leukocytoclastic vasculitis.

cu·ta·ne·ous vas·cu·li·tis

(kyū-tā'nē-ŭs vas'kyū-lī'tis)
An acute form of vasculitis that may affect the skin only, but also may involve other organs, with a polymorphonuclear infiltrate in the walls of and surrounding small (dermal) vessels. Nuclear fragments are formed by karyorrhexis of the neutrophils.
See also: leukocytoclastic vasculitis
References in periodicals archive ?
Purpuric eruptions and urticarial vasculitis are categorized as cutaneous vasculitis and together accounted for 42% of all skin lesions.
The spectrum of paraneoplastic cutaneous vasculitis in a defined population: incidence and clinical features.
3,4) However, reports began surfacing around late 2009 and early 2010 about a characteristic cutaneous vasculitis found in cocaine users associated with neutropenia and positive antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs).
Different types of skin eruptions have been reported, the most common include: lichenoid eruptions and cutaneous vasculitis, characterized by the appearance of purpuric plaques and painful hemorrhagic blisters, that suddenly appear anywhere on the body, but with predilection for the lower extremities, nose and ears, as those present in patient # 2 (12,14).
Secondary Raynaud's phenomenon and cutaneous vasculitis associated with the use of interferon
Cutaneous vasculitis may be present as a significant component of many diseases such as equine viral arteritis (EVA), equine herpes virus infection, Equine ehrlichiosis, African horse sickness, Hendra disease, Venezuelan equine encephalitides, congestive heart failure and angioneurotic edema (Del, 2000).
Cutaneous vasculitis associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection: case report and literature review.
The diagnosis of drug-induced cutaneous vasculitis can be suspected clinically and its hallmark is palpable purpura, most frequently on the lower limbs.
Several cases of cutaneous vasculitis have been reported.
Cholestatic hepatitis, cutaneous vasculitis, and vascular deposits of immunglobulin M and complement associated with hepatitis A virus infection.
Baseline SLE activity, the presence of cutaneous vasculitis, and higher prednisone doses were significantly more frequent on univariate analysis in subjects who had a stroke than in those who did not have a stroke.