cutaneous anthrax


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Related to cutaneous anthrax: Bacillus anthracis, pulmonary anthrax

anthrax

 [an´thraks]
an infectious disease seen most often in cattle, horses, mules, sheep, and goats, due to ingestion of spores of Bacillus anthracis. It can be acquired by humans through contact with infected animals or their byproducts, such as carcasses or skins.

Anthrax in humans usually occurs as a malignant pustule or malignant edema of the skin. In rare instances it can affect the lungs if the spores of the bacillus are inhaled, or it can involve the intestinal tract when infected meat is eaten. The condition often is accompanied by hemorrhage, as the exotoxins from the bacillus attack the endothelium of small blood vessels. The condition is treated by the use of antibiotics such as penicillin and the tetracyclines. The malignant edema can be treated with intravenous hydrocortisone. The disorder is also known by a variety of names, including woolsorters' disease, ragpickers' disease, and charbon.
cutaneous anthrax anthrax due to lodgment of the causative organisms in wounds or abrasions of the skin, producing a black crusted pustule on a broad zone of edema.
gastrointestinal anthrax anthrax due to ingestion of poorly cooked meat contaminated with Bacillus anthracis, with deposition of spores in the submucosa of the intestinal tract, where they germinate, multiply, and produce toxin, resulting in massive edema, which may obstruct the bowel, hemorrhage, and necrosis.
inhalational anthrax a usually fatal form of anthrax due to inhalation of dust containing anthrax spores, which are transported to the regional lymph nodes where they germinate, multiply, and produce toxin, and characterized by hemorrhagic edematous mediastinitis, pleural effusions, dyspnea, cyanosis, stridor, and shock. It is usually an occupational disease, such as in persons who handle or sort contaminated wools and fleeces. Antimicrobial prophylaxis is used to prevent the condition. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has published interim guidelines for investigation and response to Bacillus anthracis infection. The evaluation of risk for exposure to aerosolized spores is of highest priority. Obtaining adequate samples, avoiding cross-contamination, and insuring proficient testing and evaluation of test results are all recommended.
meningeal anthrax a rare, usually fatal form of anthrax resembling typical hemorrhagic meningitis due to spread through the bloodstream of Bacillus anthracis from a primary focus of infection; manifestations include cerebrospinal fluid that is hemorrhagic and neurological signs and symptoms.
pulmonary anthrax inhalational anthrax.

cu·ta·ne·ous an·thrax

dermatologic B. anthracis infection produces a characteristic lesion that begins as a papule and soon becomes a vesicle and breaks, discharging a bloody serum; the seat of this vesicle, in about 36 hours, becomes a bluish black necrotic mass; constitutional symptoms of septicemia are severe: high fever, vomiting, profuse sweating, and extreme prostration; the infection is often fatal.
Synonym(s): malignant pustule

cutaneous anthrax

See anthrax.

cu·ta·ne·ous an·thrax

(kyū-tānē-ŭs anthraks)
Dermatologic infection produces a characteristic lesion that begins as a papule and soon becomes a vesicle and breaks, discharging a bloody serum; the seat of this vesicle, in about 36 hours, becomes a bluish black necrotic mass; constitutional symptoms of septicemia are severe: high fever, vomiting, profuse sweating, and extreme prostration; the infection is often fatal.

anthrax

a peracute disease of all animal species, caused by Bacillus anthracis, and characterized by septicemia and sudden death. The causative bacteria form long-living spores which maintain the disease on a farm for many years. Significant necropsy findings include exudation of dark, tarry blood from the body orifices, failure of the blood to clot, absence of rigor mortis and splenomegaly. A dangerous zoonosis. Easily controlled by vaccination of livestock.

alimentary anthrax
infection resulting from the ingestion of animals dead of anthrax. Largely a human manifestation in developing countries.
anthrax belt
regions where anthrax is enzootic, where soil and climate favor persistence of the organism in soil and where routine efforts to control the disease are not sufficient. Outbreaks commonly follow climatic extremes of flood or drought.
cutaneous anthrax
anthrax due to lodgment of the causative organisms in wounds or abrasions of the skin, producing a black crusted pustule on a broad zone of edema. A common form of the disease in humans.
pulmonary anthrax
infection of the respiratory tract resulting from inhalation of dust or animal hair containing spores of Bacillus anthracis; an occupational disease of humans usually affecting those who handle and sort wools and fleeces (woolsorters' disease).
References in periodicals archive ?
sibiricum should be considered as a possible cause of lesions suspected of being cutaneous anthrax.
For mild cases of cutaneous anthrax, the use of ciprofloxacin (500 mg twice daily), doxycycline (100 mg twice daily), or amoxicillin (500 mg 3 times daily) is recommended (3).
Cutaneous anthrax is the most common manifestation of naturally acquired B.
A Gram stain and culture of vesicular fluid will confirm cutaneous anthrax.
If a patient's occupational history and a history of the evolving skin rash make you suspect cutaneous anthrax, do a routine Gram's stain and culture or take a biopsy and culture to make the diagnosis, experts said in an interview.
They are the one to Mr Daschle, one to the two people with cutaneous anthrax, and one to NBC newsreader Tom Brokaw, which has infected a further two people.
They are the one to Mr Daschle, one to the New York Post which has infected two people with cutaneous anthrax, and one to NBC newsreader Tom Brokaw, which has infected a further two people.
where the letter originated, have tested positive for cutaneous anthrax.
But doctors only realised he had cutaneous anthrax last Friday when it was announced an aide to an NBC newsman had the condition.
Centers for Disease Control (CDC), with appropriate antimicrobial therapy deaths are rare in cutaneous anthrax, but case-fatality is extremely high in inhalation anthrax, even with supportive antibiotic therapy.
Of the 9 persons with cutaneous anthrax, 1 (the female villager) died.
The State Sanitary Epidemiological Surveillance said cutaneous anthrax cases were revealed and 4 people with anthrax were taken to the hospital.

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