geroderma

(redirected from cutaneous ageing)
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geroderma

 [jer″o-der´mah]
dystrophy of the skin and genitals, giving the appearance of old age.

ger·o·der·ma

(jer'ō-dĕr'mă),
1. The atrophic skin of the aged.
2. Any condition in which the skin is thinned and wrinkled, resembling the integument of old age.
[gero- + G. derma, skin]

geroderma

/gero·der·ma/ (jer-o-der´mah) dystrophy of the skin and genitals, giving the appearance of old age.

geroderma

[jer′ədur′mə]
Etymology: Gk, geron, old man, derma, skin
1 the atrophic skin of aging.
2 skin that is thin and wrinkled as a result of a defective state of nutrition.
3 any condition characterized by skin that is thin and wrinkled, resembling the skin of old age.

geroderma

A term that encompasses:
(1) True ageing phenomena affecting the skin; and
(2) Photoageing.

ger·o·der·ma

(jer'ō-dĕr'mă)
1. The atrophic skin of the aged.
2. Any condition in which the skin is thinned and wrinkled, resembling the integument of old age.
[gero- + G. derma, skin]

geroderma

The characteristic skin changes occurring in old age—atrophy, pigmentation, drying, loss of fat and loss of elasticity.

geroderma, gerodermia

dystrophy of the skin and genitals, giving the appearance of old age.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary Image dermatology is a high-growth market opportunity based on the increasing numbers of people turning to medical and surgical intervention to combat signs of cutaneous ageing and to correct perceived deficits in physical form.
Demand for therapeutic dermatologicals to treat conditions such as alopecia, cutaneous ageing, photodamage, skin pigmentation, and the lipodermal disorders of obesity and gynoid lipodystrophy (cellulite) will be driven by factors such as increasing worldwide ageing populations; unrelenting media fixation on physical improvement and restorative antiageing treatments; and innovation in the pharmaceutical industry to bring to market highly sophisticated efficacious drug treatments that serve to close the gap between medical and cosmetic interventions.
Drugs such as botulinum toxins, retinoids, acid peels, 5-alpha reductase and lipase inhibitors associated with cutaneous ageing, photodamage, pigmentation defects, alopecia, and the lipodermal disorders of obesity and gynoid lipodystrophy are critically discussed to provide a detailed analysis of the high-growth market sector estimated at US$1.