cutaneous


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Related to cutaneous: cutaneous leishmaniasis, cutaneous sensation, cutaneous horn, cutaneous respiration, cutaneous larva migrans, cutaneous membrane

cutaneous

 [ku-ta´ne-us]
pertaining to the skin.

cu·ta·ne·ous

(kyū-tā'nē-ŭs),
Relating to the skin.
[L. cutis, skin]

cutaneous

/cu·ta·ne·ous/ (ku-ta´ne-us) pertaining to the skin.

cutaneous

(kyo͞o-tā′nē-əs)
adj.
Of, relating to, or affecting the skin.

cu·ta′ne·ous·ly adv.

cutaneous

[kyo̅o̅tā′nē·əs]
Etymology: L, cutis, skin
pertaining to the skin.

anthrax

Greek, anthrax, a burning coal, charbon, milzbrand Infectious disease An often fatal bacterial infection which occurs when Bacillus anthracis endospores, primarily of grazing herbivore–cattle, sheep, horses, mules–origin enter via skin abrasions, inhalation, or orally Pathogenesis Anthrax endospores germinate within macrophages, become vegetative bacteria, multiply within the lymphatics, enter the bloodstream and cause massive septicemia Clinical URI-like symptoms, followed by high fever, vomiting, joint pain, SOB, internal and external hemorrhage, hypotension, meningitis, pulmonary edema, shock sudden death; intestinal anthrax is caused by ingestion of contaminated meat; cutaneous anthrax is rare Diagnosis ELISA for capsule antigens–95+% senstivity, for protective antigen–72% sensitivity; detection of exotoxins in blood is unreliable Prevention Prophylaxis–6 wks with doxycycline or ciprofloxacin; vaccination, with anthrax vaccine absorbed; decontamination with aerosolized formalin Management Penicillin, doxycycline; if allergic to penicillin, chloramaphenicol, erythromycin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin See Bacillus anthracis, Cutaneous anthrax, Industrial anthrax, Inhalation anthrax.
Anthrax, clinical forms
Pulmonary
Almost universally fatal–due to inhalation of anthrax spores which germinate and produce toxins resulting in pleural effusions, hemorrhage, cyanosis, SOB, stridor, shock, death
Inhalation
Anthrax pneumonia, inhalational anthrax, pulmonary anthrax An almost universally fatal form due to inhalation of 1 to 2 µm pathogenic endospores which are deposited in alveoli, engulfed by macrophages and germinate en route to the mediastinal and peribronchial lymph nodes, produce toxins Clinical Mediastinal widening, pleural effusions, fever, nonproductive cough, myalgia, malaise, hemorrhage, cyanosis, SOB, stridor, shock, death, often accompanied by mesenteric lymphadenitis, diffuse abdominal pain, fever
Cutaneous
Once common among handlers of infected animals, eg farmers, woolsorters, tanners, brushmakers and carpetmakers in an era when brushes were from animals Clinical Carbuncle–a cluster of boils, that later ulcerates, resulting in a hard black center surrounded by bright red inflammation; rare cases which become systemic are almost 100% fatal
Gastrointestinal
After ingesting contaminated meat–2 to 5 days; once ingested spores germinate, causing ulceration, hemorrhagic and necrotizing gastroenteritis Clinical Fever, diffuse abdominal pain with rebound tenderness, melanic stools, vomit, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, shock; death is due to intestinal perforation or anthrax toxemia
Oropharyngeal
Uncommon, follows ingestion of contaminated meat Clinical Cervical edema, lymphadenopathy–causing dysphagia, respiratory difficulty
Anthrax meningitis
A rare, usually fatal complication of GI or inhalation anthrax with death occurring 1 to 6 days after onset of illness Clinical Meningeal symptoms, nuchal rigidity, fever, fatigue, myalgia, headache, N&V, agitation, seizures, delirium, followed by neurologic degeneration and death
.

cu·ta·ne·ous

(kyū-tā'nē-ŭs)
Relating to the skin.
[L. cutis, skin]

cutaneous

Pertaining to the skin.

Cutaneous

Pertaining to the skin.

cutaneous

of skin

cu·ta·ne·ous

(kyū-tā'nē-ŭs)
Relating to the skin.
[L. cutis, skin]

cutaneous (kūtā´nēus),

adj relating to the skin. Tests of cutaneous hypersensitivity may be indicators of malnutrition and are useful in determining a patient's readiness for surgery.

cutaneous

pertaining to the skin. See also under headings of individual diseases, e.g. cutaneous actinobacillosis.

idiopathic cutaneous and renal glomerular disease
a disease affecting racing Greyhounds caused by a Shigella-like toxin produced by Escherichia coli H157:07, found in uncooked meat. There is a severe vasculitis with cutaneous necrosis, renal failure and death. Called also Alabama rot, Greenetrack disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, we determined an exposure-effect indicator that better described the association of UV with cutaneous melanoma incidence rate.
Companies discussed in this Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma C Pipeline Review, H2 2014 report include Affimed Therapeutics AG, Chipscreen Biosciences Ltd, Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
The hematogenous route, in particular, may be responsible for distant cutaneous metastases.
What were the trends in the rates of invasive and cutaneous fusariosis between 2000 and 2010?
This finding mirrors what has been observed in other reports of cutaneous malignancies in African populations, where malignant melanoma is noted to be 1 of the 3 most common cutaneous malignancies along with squamous cell carcinoma and Kaposi sarcoma.
The sudden increase in cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis reverses a trend which had seen cases fall over recent years.
On examination there was scarring to the left mental region with evidence of previous revision surgery and a draining cutaneous sinus (Fig.
BERLIN - Patients with migraine and depression have more than twice the odds of experiencing cutaneous allodynia during a headache attack than do patients with migraine but no depression, according to a survey of 2,597 patients.
Allopurinol is primarily prescribed for patients who have gout, and most data on severe cutaneous reactions to the drug have been based on case series or chart reviews from a single academic center.
Primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas: clinicopathologic features, classification, and prognostic factors in a large series of patients.
Ozturk S, Cil Y, Sengezer M, Yigit T, Eski M, Ozcan A: Squamous cell carcinoma arising in the giant cutaneous horns accompanied with renal cell carcinoma.
9] The chest and abdomen are the most common sites for all cutaneous metastases, whereas the face and scalp are the least common.