curse

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curse

(kers),
An affliction thought to be invoked by a malevolent spirit.

curse

(kŭrs)
An affliction thought to be invoked by an evil spirit.

curse

(kĕrs)
1. To attempt to inflict injury by appeal to a malevolent supernatural power.
2. Injury assumed to have been inflicted by a malevolent supernatural power.
3. To use foul, offensive language.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prosecutors accused the suspect of blasphemy by cursing a holy religion and religious personalities.
As part of her contributions to the All Along The Wall song and poetry show, Julie had written a song called Cursing Stone.
The bad luck began shortly after the city council erected a Cursing Stone inscribed with a 16thcentury spell condemning the work of evil-doers.
If people think the cursing stone is at the root of these problems, and that's a view I share, it would be better if it was removed.
When cursing harms the innocent, I think it's wrong.
Jay, whose scholarship on cursing and related matters occupies a page and a half of his own bibliography, ventures that cussing usually is a product of anger.
The T-shirt told the fictitious story of a man with an Italian accent so thick, his attempts at conversation were taken as cursing.
In bad times we wail and bemoan our fate, cursing the darkness; in good times, we ignore our Creator from whom all good and perfect gifts come.
Some insisted that it was but a manifestation of hysteria; others suggested that multiple tics and cursing (coprolalia) were a subset of movement disorders known as choreas and which were caused by a prior attack of rheumatic fever.
An emblem of this tendency, in Shakespeare, she finds in Caliban's cursing Prospero in the language Prospero gave him ("You taught me language, and my profit on't / Is I know how to curse").
Dubai: A horse trainer has been jailed for three months for cursing Islam and Muslims, assaulting and threatening residency and police officers and behaving rowdily at the airport while she was intoxicated.
Bernard Mees (Fellow of the University of Melbourne) presents Celtic Curses, the first in-depth, scholarly assessment of early Celtic cursing, including but far from limited to the binding tablets of ancient Britain and Gaul, as well as records of early medieval Celtic stipulation and binding.
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