cure

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Related to cures: Natural Cures

cure

 [kūr]
1. the course of treatment of any disease, or of a special case.
2. the successful treatment of a disease or wound.
3. a system of treating diseases.
4. a medicine effective in treating a disease.

cure

(kyūr),
1. To heal; to make well.
2. A restoration to health.
3. A special method or course of treatment.
See: dental curing.
[L. curo, to care for]

cure

(kūr)
1. the treatment of any disease, or of a special case.
2. the successful treatment of a disease or wound.
3. a system of treating diseases.
4. a medicine effective in treating a disease.

cure

(kyo͝or)
n.
1. Restoration of health; recovery from disease.
2. A method or course of treatment used to restore health.
3. An agent, such as a drug, that restores health; a remedy.
v.
1. To restore a person to health.
2. To effect a recovery from a disease or disorder.

cure

[kyo̅o̅r]
Etymology: L, cura
1 restoration to health of a person afflicted with a disease or other disorder.
2 the favorable outcome of the treatment of a disease or other disorder.
3 a course of therapy, a medication, a therapeutic measure, or another remedy used in treatment of a medical problem, as faith healing, fasting, rest cure, or work cure.

cure

Materials science
verb To change the state or properties of a substance, as in the curing of a polymer or resin in dentistry.
 
Medspeak
noun Restoration to a usual state of health.
verb To heal, restore to health.
 
Oncology
noun A clinical state characterised by a long-term (often ≥ 5 years, depending on the cancer) absence of cancer-related symptom(s).

Pseudomedicine
noun See Greek cancer cure, Kelley cure.

cure

noun Medtalk Restoration to a usual state of health. See Natural cure verb Medtalk To heal, restore to health.

cure

(kyūr)
1. To heal; to make well.
2. A restoration to health.
3. A special method or course of treatment.
4. Hardening of certain materials with time or by the application of heat, light, or chemical agents, e.g., polymerization of acrylic denture-based material.
[L. curo, to care for]

cure

1. Complete resolution of a disease.
2. The failure to find any indications of a disease, especially cancer, for an arbitrary period, often five years.

cure,

n/v 1. to eliminate illness or disease, to return to a healthy state.
2. elimination or end of symptoms or syndrome. See also direction of cure and healing.

cure

(kyūr)
1. To heal; to make well.
2. A restoration to health.
3. A special method or course of treatment.
[L. curo, to care for]

cure,

n 1. the successful treatment of a disease or wound.
2. a procedure or reaction that changes a plastic material to a hard material (e.g., vulcanization and polymerization). See also process.

cure

1. the course of treatment of any disease, or of a special case.
2. the successful treatment of a disease or wound.
3. a system of treating diseases.
4. a medicine effective in treating a disease.
5. preserve meat by salting, smoking, pickling.

Patient discussion about cure

Q. What is the best natural cure for migraines? Every day I hear something else... would love it if you can share your experience...I'm sick of chemicals:)

A. stay off any products that have a any kind of a caffine content, including chocolate. try this for 3wks, ypu should notice a difference

Q. Cn barret esophagous be cured? I was diagnosed with barretts esophagus several years ago, and so far keeps on the routine follow up. I met some other guy with same condition and he told after his doctor prescribed him with some anti-reflux meds, in the last endoscopy they found normal esophagus, and that he thinks he's now cured. Is that possible?

A. Anti-reflux treatment may lower the risk of cancer a little, but it won't cure it, so there's still a need for refular follow-up.

Q. What is the cure for psoriatic arthritis? I know someone with psoriatic arthritis. What is the cure? Please don't waste my time with anecdotal evidence from anonymous people who drink expensive imported juice and claim to be healed. What treatments and cures are available? What science is behind the remedies?

A. First off, has your friend actually had a biopsy done on the skin to positively confirm the diagnosis? I was diagnosed with the same thing years ago. I then sought a second opinion from a dermatologist who did a biopsy. It wasn't psoriatic arthritis at all. It was Lichen Planus.
If however, it is Psoriatic Arthritis, then I would highly recommend either a Rheumatologist, or a Homeopath/Naturopath. Personally, I prefer the Homeopathic approach. There are no man-made chemicals involved, which our bodies are not designed to assimilate. Introducing an artificial chemical to the human body often times creates an alternate imbalance somewhere else, with its own set of problems.

More discussions about cure
References in classic literature ?
Genestas noticed a fair number of roofs of tarred shingle, but yet more of them were thatched; a few were tiled, and some seven or eight (belonging no doubt to the cure, the justice of the peace, and some of the wealthier townsmen) were covered with slates.
It seems indeed to be a work that requires some exactness, but the professor assured us, "that if it were dexterously performed, the cure would be infallible.
Sire," said he, "I know that no physician has been able to cure your majesty, but if you will follow my instructions, I will promise to cure you without any medicines or outward application.
Seeing this, Don Quixote raised his eyes to heaven, and fixing his thoughts, apparently, upon his lady Dulcinea, exclaimed, "Aid me, lady mine, in this the first encounter that presents itself to this breast which thou holdest in subjection; let not thy favour and protection fail me in this first jeopardy;" and, with these words and others to the same purpose, dropping his buckler he lifted his lance with both hands and with it smote such a blow on the carrier's head that he stretched him on the ground, so stunned that had he followed it up with a second there would have been no need of a surgeon to cure him.
He will not fail, therefore, to set a due value on any plan which, without violating the principles to which he is attached, provides a proper cure for it.
You are as bad as your brother, Mary; but we will cure you both.
I sent last evening for the cure of the nearest French village, who spent an hour with him.
Give the man who is not made To his trade Swords to fling and catch again, Coins to ring and snatch again, Men to harm and cure again, Snakes to charm and lure again - He'll be hurt by his own blade, By his serpents disobeyed, By his clumsiness bewrayed,' By the people mocked to scorn - So 'tis not with juggler born
I've taken a house near here for the holidays, where I'm going in for a Rest Cure of my own description.
This simple thought could not occur to the doctors (as it cannot occur to a wizard that he is unable to work his charms) because the business of their lives was to cure, and they received money for it and had spent the best years of their lives on that business.
His first cure occurred in the eighth year of his life as a hermit.
I can cure it, I think, and without drugs," was Martin's answer.