curandero


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Related to curandero: Santeria

curandero

/cu·ran·de·ro/ (koo-ron-da´ro) [Sp.] healer; a man who practices curanderismo.

curandero

(ko͞o′rən-dâr′ō)
n. pl. curande·ros
A man who practices folk medicine; an herb doctor.
A native healer or shaman who uses herbal medicines in the primitive cultures of Central America
References in periodicals archive ?
As a young man, his reputation as a curandero spread.
In special cases, and often for children, an egg limpia will be administered; a fresh whole egg is held by the curandero and circled gently over the body.
The average curandero, CSUN's Mora said, is someone who is passing along what he or she learned as an apprentice.
8) In 2006, Cucurto started a blog, Curandero del amor in which he invited his fans to take part in discussing his book as well as Sarlo's attacks.
A Curandero, also known as a folk healer, is a person who in addition to practicing one or more of the above specialties, also incorporates the use of religion and other rituals such as a limpia into the holistic treatment plan.
For example, the anthropologist in Castillo taught courses at the University of Houston on Mexican-American culture, and had spent over two years interviewing people involved with curandero practice and reading about similar practices.
The book includes a brief history of curanderismo, the role of the curandero, the common ailments that are diagnosed, rituals and treatments.
Likewise, curandero David Young says platicas attempt to get patients "out of their heads into a process that moves them past thinking into their hearts.
Do you receive health care from anyone besides a medical doctor, such as an acupuncturist, herbalist, curandero, or other healer?
When she describes her friend's husband as "an honest-to-God Huichol curandero," the narrator, Guadalupe, reveals how authenticity plays a fundamental role in her conception of identity, as well as demonstrating a privileging of that which is truly indigenous.
The Lubola is characterized by the presentation of clearly defined characters: the standard bearer, with his elegance and dexterity, who begins each parade; the broom dealer, reminiscent of the fetish with his broom juggling, who "cleans the air" for the rest of the procession; the mama vieja, who, despite her years, does not want to miss the celebrations; and the gramillero, the ancient curandero with his bag full of medicinal herbs, elegantly dressed in his Sunday best with baton, performing an enigmatic, vibrating dance.
In the indigenous use of Salvia divinorum, a curandero would typically brew the salvia into a beverage, which would then be consumed by those seeking visions under the curandero's guidance.