spine

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spine

 [spīn]
1. a thornlike process or projection; called also acantha and spina.
2. the rigid bony structure in the midline of the back, composed of the vertebrae; called also backbone, spinal column, and vertebral column.



The spinal column is the axis of the skeleton; the skull and limbs are in a sense appendages. The vertebrae also provide the protective bony corridor (spinal canal) through which the spinal cord passes; they can move to a certain extent and so give flexibility to the spine, allowing it to bend forward, sideways and, to a lesser extent, backward. In the areas of the neck and lower back, the spine also can pivot, which permits the turning of the head and torso.

There are usually 24 movable vertebrae and nine that are fused together. The topmost are the seven cervical vertebrae, which form the back of the neck, supporting the skull. The head turns from side to side by means of a pivotal motion between the two highest vertebrae. Below these are the 12 thoracic vertebrae, the supports on which the ribs are hinged, and then the five lumbar vertebrae, the largest movable vertebrae (the cervical are the smallest). Below the lumbar vertebrae, the spine terminates with two groups of vertebrae fused into single bones: the sacrum, composed of five vertebrae, and the coccyx, composed of four vertebrae. Viewed from the side of the body, the spine has the shape of a gentle double S curve.
Malformations of the Spine. Of the various types of spinal malformations, some are congenital and others the result of postural defects or injuries. spina bifida is congenital. kyphosis may occasionally be congenital but is more often caused by one of the diseases that attack the structure of the bones. The most common of these is pott's disease, or tuberculosis affecting the vertebrae and soft tissues of the spine. Another is osteitis deformans, a type of bone inflammation in which parts of the bone are replaced by softer tissue. scoliosis is a curvature of the spine toward one side.
cervical spine that portion of the spine comprising the cervical vertebrae.
lumbar spine that portion of the spine comprising the lumbar vertebrae.
thoracic spine that part of the spine comprising the thoracic vertebrae.

spine

(spīn), [TA]
1. A short, sharp, thornlike process of bone; a spinous process. Synonym(s): spina [TA]
2. Synonym(s): vertebral column
[L. spina]

spine

(spīn)
1. a slender, thornlike process or projection.

alar spine , angular spine s. of sphenoid bone.
bamboo spine  the rigid spine produced by ankylosing spondylitis, so called from its radiographic appearance.
cervical spine  that portion of the spine comprising the cervical vertebrae.
cleft spine  spina bifida.
ischial spine  a bony process projecting backward and medialward from the posterior border of the ischium.
lumbar spine  that portion of the spine comprising the lumbar vertebrae.
mental spine, inferior  the lower part of a small bony projection on the internal surface of the mandible, near the lower end of the midline, serving for attachment of the geniohyoid muscle.
mental spine, superior  the upper part of a small bony projection on the internal surface of the mandible, near the lower end of the midline, serving for attachment of the genioglossus muscle.
nasal spine, anterior  the sharp anterosuperior projection at the anterior extremity of the nasal crest of the maxilla.
nasal spine, posterior  a sharp, backward-projecting bony spine forming the medial posterior angle of the horizontal part of the palatine bone.
neural spine  the spinous process of a vertebra.
palatine spines  laterally placed ridges on the lower surface of the maxillary part of the hard palate, separating the palatine sulci.
poker spine , rigid spine the ankylosed spine produced by rheumatoid spondylitis.
spine of scapula  a triangular bony plate attached by one end to the back of the scapula.
sciatic spine  ischial s.
spine of sphenoid bone  the posterior and downward projection from the lower aspect of the great wing of the sphenoid bone.
thoracic spine  that part of the spine comprising the thoracic vertebrae.
spine of tibia  a longitudinally elongated, raised and roughened area on the anterior crest of the tibia.
trochlear spine  a bony spicule on the anteromedial part of the orbital surface of the frontal bone for attachment of the trochlea of the superior oblique muscle.

spine

(spīn)
n.
1. The spinal column of a vertebrate.
2. Zoology Any of various pointed projections, processes, or appendages of animals.
3. Botany
a. A strong, sharp-pointed outgrowth derived from a leaf or leaf part.
b. Any of various similar sharp structures, such as a thorn.

spine

2 descriptive of a spinous process.

Spine

A failed UK-wide infrastructure initiative developed by the National Programme for IT, which was meant to allow NHS workers to securely access patient information from any place in the country. It was to form the basis for the Integrated Care Record Service, the nationally networked version of local electronic patient records. It consisted of applications holding care-record data, security applications to restrict access to accredited users and a messaging service, providing interfaces between Spine data and other services, such as Choose and Book, GP2GP and the Electronic Prescription Service. It had a central pool of administrative (NHS number, date of birth, name and address), and was to have summary clinical data (allergies, adverse drug reactions and major treatments).

The Spine was meant to provide
• Personal Demographics Service
• Spine Directory Service
• Electronic Prescription Service
• Summary Care Record

spine

Vox populi Vertebral column, see there. See Kissing spine, Spear tackler's spine.

spine

(spīn) [TA]
1. A short, sharp, thornlike process of bone; a spinous process.
2. Synonym(s): vertebral column.
3. The bar or stay in a horse's hoof.
[L. spina]

spine

See VERTEBRAL COLUMN.

spine

any sharp pointed structure.

Spine

A term for the backbone that includes the vertebrae, disks, and spinal cord as a whole.
Mentioned in: Cervical Spondylosis

spine

(spīn) [TA]
A short, sharp, thornlike process of bone; a spinous process.
[L. spina]

spine, spina

1. a thornlike process or projection.
2. the backbone, or vertebral column. See also spinal.

cuneal spine
the axial ridge of the upper surface of the frog in the hoof of the horse that projects into the digital cushion.
iliac spine
small salients along the dorsal and ventral borders of the ilium, divided into cranial and caudal, dorsal and ventral, in cats and dogs, contrasted to the single sacral and coxal tubers in large animals.
ischial spine
the crest of bone to which the sacrosciatic ligament attaches and which provides the origin of the gluteus profundus muscle.
plant s's
cause cutaneous laceration and subcutaneous abscess, oral mucosal laceration and ulceration, conjunctival injury.
scapular spine
the ridge that divides the lateral surface of the scapula into the supraspinous and infraspinous fossae.

Patient discussion about spine

Q. Anyone have knowledge of cancer in the spine? Doctors think my 40 year old brother has. My brother has been undergoing test and treatnment for back problems since a vehicle accident in August. The did a test last week and Monday said they saw 4 nodules they think are cancer, his doctor said everytime he had seen this it was cancer. I am devestated right now but trying to stay positive. I am sure you will notice it on the site b/c I know it is affecting me and the stress and worry has the fibromyalgia kicking in at full speed:-( PLEASE anything you can tell me would be a help!

A. Thank you for the answer and the prayers!

Q. I have hurt my cervical spine and shoulder in a rear end car crash in July. Why does it still hurt?

A. Spine and back injuries are known to to be causing a lot of pain and discomfort and for a long period of time. You should try and do some mellow exercise and physiotherapy that might help you a lot. If the pain is unbarable, you should consult your doctor about using pain medications.

Q. Has anyone had a spine fusion that failed? Or hardware that failed?

A. Haven't experienced it myself, but here (http://www.spine-health.com/forum/treatments/back-surgery-and-neck-surgery) you may find a discussion about it.

More discussions about spine