culture shock


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culture shock

n.
A condition of confusion and anxiety affecting a person suddenly exposed to an alien culture or milieu.

culture shock

the psychological effect of a drastic change in the cultural environment of an individual. The person may exhibit feelings of helplessness, discomfort, and disorientation in attempting to adapt to a different cultural group with dissimilar practices, values, and beliefs.
A constellation of emotions including a sense of isolation, rejection and alienation which is experienced by a person or group when transplanted from a familiar to an unfamiliar culture—e.g., from one country to another; disorientation and confusion when visiting or relocating to culture different from one’s own

culture shock

Social medicine Feelings of isolation, rejection and alienation experienced by a person or group when transplanted from a familiar to an unfamiliar culture–eg, from one country to another; disorientation and confusion when visiting or relocating to culture different from one's own
References in periodicals archive ?
He said that although concepts about culture shock were developed by Oberg, the idea was not conceived by him.
Lysgaard (1955), quoted by Coleen Ward et alii in The Psychology of Culture Shock proposed in his cross-cultural study a U-curve model of adjustment during cross-cultural relocation based on his investigation of some Scandinavian students in the United States.
Culture shock also initially affected the PTs' ability to make instructional decisions.
According to Mary Ellen Colon, a cross-cultural specialist, who has worked with many people going through culture shock both in Mexico and the U.
The company does some unique things to lessen the culture shock a Japan expatriate might experience.
This study explored: (a) the differences between MKs and Non-MKs on measures of parental attachment, perceived social support, reverse culture shock and college adjustment; (b) within-group difference on the personality measures for MKs; and (c) the relations between the constructs of parental attachment, perceived social support, reverse culture shock and college adjustment for MKs and for Non-MKs.
It also shows that an early Victorian can overcome the culture shock of British, India, and that it is possible to adjust to local religious and cultural practices and government obstacles without accepting them.
Gillian Clarke fully expected to experience culture shock when she left her Vancouver Island home in January 1997 and travelled to Tanzania to work as a Volunteer in Mission at a theological college.
He understands first hand the huge adjustment and culture shock faced by immigrants to New Zealand.
Upon leaving the United States for several months of study at a Japanese university, Leo got a crash course in culture shock.
The resulting tapestry of tortured politics and humorous incidences of culture shock are all rendered with journalistic clarity and objectivity.
Strategies such as componentization, tactical replacement and outsourcing are increasingly viewed as providing the capabilities to solve the insurance core systems dilemma - how best to meet short (product development) and long-term (legacy retirement) demands that satisfy the needs of business and IT, while minimizing culture shock and risk