cuirass


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cuirass

 [kwe-ras´]
a covering for the chest.

cui·rass

(kwē-ras'),
The anterior surface of the thorax in relation to symptoms or disease changes.
[Fr. cuirasse, a breastplate]

cuirass

[kwiras′]
Etymology: Fr, cuirasse, breastplate
1 also called cuirass ventilator, a negative-pressure full-body respirator. It consists of a rigid shell that conforms to the surfaces of the body from the neck to the hips. Ventilating pressure is delivered through a flexible hose attached to the top of the device. An electrically driven pump is adjusted to match the timing of the patient's spontaneous breathing.
2 a tightly fitted chest bandage.

cuirass

(kwē-răs′) [Fr. cuirasse, breastplate]
A firm bandage around the chest.
References in periodicals archive ?
Likely the painting was cut at the bottom, since part of Minerva's cuirass and feet are missing.
Taking advantage of the possibilities offered by the cuirass of the Prima Porta statue, or by the toga of the Via Labicana statue, is not necessarily the same as rejecting a naked form.
The figure apparently wears military garb, including a checkerboard kilt/tunic from the waist down, a cuirass on the chest, and what appears to be banded mail above the cuirass to the very top of the neck.
This is the case of the word [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], a polysemous term in ancient Greek that means, in fact, both the cuirass and the thorax, which is the part of the soldier's body protected by the cuirass.
The armor itself was an artistic prop; during the civil wars, only a cuirass, with detachable breast and back plates, was normally worn with a buff-coat and light helmet.
Some scholars maintain that warriors might wear either such a belt or a cuirass, not both at once.
Drews then looks at how the success of these barbarian troops, coupled with the introduction of new arms such as the slashing sword, javelin, and cuirass, led to the supremacy of infantry over chariots.
O bold was the bearing, and brisk the career, And broad was the cuirass and long was the spear, And tall was the plume that waved over the brow Of that dark reckless borderer, Wat o' the Cleuch.
Paraskevaides currently has a Greek cuirass from around the 4th century BC (around 200,000 [pounds sterling]), its musculature superbly modelled in bronze with a painterly mottled patina (Fig.
Only 11 patients achieved 24-hour independence from invasive positive pressure ventilation (in some cases short-lived), and 7 of these patients still required non-invasive ventilatory support (3 rocking bed, 2 BiPAP, 1 Cuirass ventilator, 1 oxygen via tracheostomy).
43) Pelops also held a shield, as indicated by the shield band remaining on his left forearm, and once wore a bronze or metal cuirass, as evidenced by the holes for attachment on his torso.
The former springs from the Latin coriacea, or leather, the cuirass designating the breastplate worn by cavalrymen, whereas the latter, ultimately from the Latin videre (to see), designates a mounted sentinel posted at the head of an advancing army.