cue

(redirected from cues)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cue

(kyū),
In conditioning and learning theory, a pattern of stimuli to which an individual has learned or is learning to respond.

cue

(kyo͞o)
n.
Psychology A stimulus, either consciously or unconsciously perceived, that elicits or signals a type of behavior.

cue

[kyo̅o̅]
a stimulus that determines or may prompt the nature of a person's response.

CUE

Abbreviation for:
Community Unit for the Elderly (Medspeak-UK)
confidential unit exclusion
cumulative urinary excretion

cue

Psychology Any sensory stimulus that evokes a learned patterned response. See Conditioning.

cue

(kyū)
In conditioning and learning theory, a pattern of stimuli to which an individual has learned or is learning to respond.

cue,

n a stimulus that determines or may prompt the nature of a person's response.
References in periodicals archive ?
Once that happened, it said, a former CUES president/ CEO agreed to work to resolve the dispute and persuaded BVS to drop the suit after it moved to federal court.
Table 1 Condition orders for pigeons in Experiment I with number of sessions per condition in parentheses Pigeon 301 302 303 304 Red Only (2) Red Only (2) Red Only (6) Red Only (2) Guiding Guiding Cues ( 14) Guiding Cues ( Guiding Cues ( 2) 5) Cues (5) Reversed Cues (5) Red Only (4) Reversed Cues (5) Guiding Cues (5) No Cues (5)
To learn more about the CUES Exceptional Leader award visit cues.
Scientists haven't been able to unlock the cues to trust because they've been going about it the wrong way," DeSteno said.
During the scans, they were shown 45-second videos that contained either smoking cues-actors and actresses smoking in a variety of settings-or neutral cues, with similar settings but no smoking behaviors.
In the present experiment exogenous cues were provided to attract visual attention to several body parts of the oncoming attacker.
The VR-CCRAS offers the potential of greater clinical utility and the ability to present specific drug cues and social interactions in environmental contexts that are congruent with the users' experiences.
The authors show us that the quirky, unplanned relationship between cue and part is something the actor must make his own.
Ten of the 25 students were completely blind and relied solely on tactile exploration of the tangible cues to receive feedback.
While the children were misconstruing facial cues, excessive activity arose in brain areas that are associated with emotion processing, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed.
Snooker stars are notorious for being attached to their cues, spending hours practising with them.
Overall conditioning and body composition (muscle to fat ratio) also plays a key role, as a finely tuned engine is able to respond to visual and auditory cues with more proficiency.