cuckold

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cuckold

noun An older term for a man whose wife has been unfaithful.
 
verb To commit adultery on one’s husband; as in, to make a cuckold of one’s husband.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, she surmises from Baccio s black chalk drawings that becco, the Italian for goat and cuckold, also refers to a bird's beak as a 'pecker'.
This focus on the audience brings me back to my overarching concern about the dance of the cuckolds and the audience.
Through it, the audience discover that they have been the cuckolds of the play, thinking themselves Horners when they are in fact Pinchwifes, and that this cuckolding is not only in the theater but outside it as well.
3) Rose Zimbardo sees the dance of the cuckolds as a parody of the "Hymeneal blessing of the green world comedies of Shakespeare" in "Wycherley: The Restoration Juvenal," Forum 17 (1979): 17-26 (24).
Pinchwife's claim of "knowingness" reveals his suspicion that all married men threaten to become cuckolds.
At the end of The London Cuckolds, the cuckolds resign themselves to having been bested, although they avoid the more serious consequence by, it seems, agreeing to forget what they have figured out about their wives.
Legend has it that King Charles joined the dance of the cuckolds at the end of the play.
Students of the Dutch language may find it interesting that whereas Renaissance authors such as Constantijn Huygens use "koeckoeck" alternately in the sense of cuckold and adulterer, Erasmus was evidently unfamiliar with the latter use in his mother tongue.
32): "Men Spot metten cochuyt ende cucurra" ("One mocks the cuckold and the |cucurra'").
The poem's most recent editor agrees, and refers us to other examples of the pun on cuckoo and cuckold.
In any case, there is no evidence that cuckoo and cuckold could mean the same thing at this time.
Even if the pun on cuckoo and cuckold were possible in late fourteenth-century English, which has yet to be demonstrated, this is hardly one of the poems in which we should expect to find it.