cuckold

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cuckold

noun An older term for a man whose wife has been unfaithful.
 
verb To commit adultery on one’s husband; as in, to make a cuckold of one’s husband.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Matthew accepts his cuckoldry with passive resignation: "Where kings are medlers, meaner men must rue" (I, 2333).
Worse yet, however, is the possibility of cuckoldry, for as Niccholes cautions widow-wooers, the very desires that were a boon to the suitor become a liability to the husband: "the best is, though the worse for thee, they [widows] are navigable without difficulty, more passable than Virginia, and lye at an easier Rode, as unsatiable as the sea, or rather the grave.
Masculine anxieties around old age, impotence, and cuckoldry were still present three centuries later despite progress in the sciences and the liberal sociopolitical attitudes promoted by the Spanish Second Republic (1931-36).
While the threat of cuckoldry from conspecifics has been incorporated into investigations of mobbing behavior (Berziiis et al.
However, their findings suggests that effects of extra-pair paternity are limited, and cuckoldry can even reduce the intensity of sexual selection.
Moreover, just prior to asking for Bardolph's whereabouts, Falstaff rails against a reluctant creditor, charging him with cuckoldry via an elaborate figure: "And yet he cannot see, though he have his own lantern to light him" (1.
Themes range from cuckoldry to corruption and draw much laughter from an audience, releasing the tension raised by the melodrama of the main story.
Clearly men have much to lose if they fail to guard their mates adequately: the threat of cuckoldry, with attendant losses in direct fitness and in misplaced paternal investment, helps to explain why human males resort to coercive, sometimes brutal, means to ensure exclusive fidelity in their female partners (Buss 2000, 34-35).
For Shakespeare's frustrated, aristocratic lovers whose labors arc lost because of the message of a death, the cuckoo in the song of spring heralds the specter of cuckoldry in that season's erotic frenzy, while the owl of winter wisely oversees the "merry" consolations of the humblest aspects of domestic life.
As history has taught us, smear campaigns against revolutionary leaders have always revolved around accusations of homosexuality, bestiality, adultery, cuckoldry, and brutal behavior of all sorts, towards both family members and friends.
Laurence Fishburne's Othello is plagued by a dream about Desdemona (Irene Jacob) writhing naked with Cassio (Nathaniel Parker)--both laughing at him and his cuckoldry.
In The Hierarchies of Cuckoldry and Bankruptcy, Fourier makes a strict taxonomy of these two social disgraces, which he saw as linked.