cubital tunnel


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cubital tunnel

An obsolete term that formerly dignified the canalicular space between the two heads of the ulnar flexor muscle of carpus, a space which carries the ulnar nerve.
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Background: Surgical decompression of the ulnar nerve is effective for cubital tunnel syndrome.
The following case report describes a case of cubital tunnel syndrome developed in association with tophaceous compression and resolved with surgical decompression in a patient with chronic gouty arthritis.
His areas of expertise includes surgery for nerve compressions such as carpal or cubital tunnel, Dupuytren's disease, tendon problems, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, as well as hand, wrist and finger injuries.
At the cubital tunnel, the ulnar nerve was decompressed in situ; decompression at the Guyon's canal included the sensory and motor branches of the ulnar nerve.
In the upper extremities, median nerve entrapment in the carpal tunnel and ulnar nerve entrapment in the cubital tunnel are most commonly diagnosed (2, 5).
Patients with secondary CTS, diabetes mellitus, peripheral neuropathy, severe CTS with muscle atrophy, those having undergone surgical release of median nerve and patients with history or confirmed other nerve entrapment in upper limbs such as cubital tunnel syndrome were excluded.
In the upper extremities, ganglia have been described to cause compression of the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal, in the cubital tunnel or of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel.
If both areas are affected, suspect a more proximal compression site at the cubital tunnel, as the dorsal ulnar cutaneous nerve branches proximal to Guyon's canal.
At that time, our young patient had undergone surgical decompression of ulnar nerve at the cubital tunnel for the first time due to ulnar neuritis confirmed by nerve conduction studies.
MGAs have been misdiagnosis during the assessment of nerve injuries, [20] carpal tunnel syndrome, [21] cubital tunnel syndrome, [18] and leprosy neuropathy.
I'm talking about things like compressive neuropathies such as carpal and cubital tunnel syndromes, neck strain, eyestrain (if not full-blown computer vision syndrome), back pain, headaches and other problems that, at their most severe, have resulted in prolonged absences or even reluctant early retirement.
Accurate diagnoses are often difficult to obtain and range from tendinitis, thoracic outlet syndrome, carpal and cubital tunnel syndromes, to the most troublesome--focal dystonia.